Media center – Saar New Media http://saar-new-media.com/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 12:22:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://saar-new-media.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-6-150x150.png Media center – Saar New Media http://saar-new-media.com/ 32 32 The Ministry of Communication prepares the media center for the G20 summit https://saar-new-media.com/the-ministry-of-communication-prepares-the-media-center-for-the-g20-summit/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 12:22:38 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/the-ministry-of-communication-prepares-the-media-center-for-the-g20-summit/ We also prepare the press release, bulletin and press briefing, so that the media can easily get (information) Jakarta (ANTARA) – The Ministry of Communication and Information Technology has prepared a media center for journalists covering the G20 summit conference in Bali in November. “The media center will be operational from November 13 to 17, […]]]>

We also prepare the press release, bulletin and press briefing, so that the media can easily get (information)

Jakarta (ANTARA) – The Ministry of Communication and Information Technology has prepared a media center for journalists covering the G20 summit conference in Bali in November.

“The media center will be operational from November 13 to 17, 2022,” director general of information and communication at the ministry, Usman Kansong, said Monday during a webinar on the coverage mechanism of the G20 summit.

The G20 is an international forum of 19 countries and the European Union working together to address big issues. Indonesia holds the presidency of the grouping this year.

Related News: Indonesian and Dutch foreign ministers discuss G20 summit preparations

The G20 Summit Media Center which the ministry has prepared is located at the Westin Resort & BICC, Nusa Dua, Bali. This room can be occupied by 1,500 journalists, nationals and foreigners.

The multimedia center is equipped with 96 computers connected to the LAN Internet network which offers a speed of 1.5 gigabytes per second.

Other facilities include a press conference room, with a capacity of 443 people, interpreters in five languages, a break room and a photocopying service.

The Ministry, as responsible for public communication, will make a press release in two languages, English and Indonesian, as well as own photos and videos that can be used by TV channels to broadcast content .

“We are also preparing the press release, bulletin and press briefing, so that the media can easily get (information),” Kansong said.

Related News: G20 TIIWG Discusses Draft Ministerial Declaration for Economic Recovery

In addition to a working room for journalists, the ministry provides transportation in the form of a shuttle service from outside the conference area to the G20 Summit media center.

Journalists, both domestic and foreign, who wish to cover the G20 summit in Bali from November 15 to 17, can register on the official G20 website. Registrations are open from September 5 to October 10, 2022.

After registering, journalists can pick up the G20 Summit Special Coverage Card at Courtyard Bali Seminyak Resort, Badung, Bali. A swab antigen test result will be required by the department upon retrieval of the coverage map.

On Tuesday, the ministry recorded that 750 journalists from 156 outlets had already registered to cover the G20 summit in Bali.

These journalists include 203 journalists from 45 national media and 547 journalists from 111 foreign media.

Related News: G20 Summit: Ministry Prepares Facilities to Support Media Coverage

Related news: Indonesia helps strengthen global health infrastructure: Marsudi

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Robertson Media Center is a hidden gem for creatives – The Cavalier Daily https://saar-new-media.com/robertson-media-center-is-a-hidden-gem-for-creatives-the-cavalier-daily/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 20:34:10 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/robertson-media-center-is-a-hidden-gem-for-creatives-the-cavalier-daily/ Nestled on the third floor of the Clemons Library, the Robertson Media Center has a treasure trove of creative technology resources available free to university students and staff. Its spaces include audio and video recording studios, a 3D printing studio, virtual reality spaces and computer labs. Forget the books – there are albums to record, […]]]>

Nestled on the third floor of the Clemons Library, the Robertson Media Center has a treasure trove of creative technology resources available free to university students and staff. Its spaces include audio and video recording studios, a 3D printing studio, virtual reality spaces and computer labs. Forget the books – there are albums to record, documentaries to film and cartoons to animate, all in the library.

RMC staff offer one-on-one consultations and specialized workshops as well as basic training for many of their resources. However, no expertise is needed to try out much of the creative technology available, although most spaces require reservation and some have brief virtual orientations.

Josh Thorud, librarian for multimedia teaching and learning at the media center, explains that often students can jump in with nothing but a creative vision in hand and learn along the way.

“That’s really what it’s there for — experimentation, innovation, just trying to get people to be creative and experiment with creative technologies,” Thorud said. “Just come in and try something.”

When entering RMC, the big decision is which space to explore first. The video production studio is the most eye-catching. Upon entering the room, the backdrops are front and center.

“It’s really cool to see people the first time they go to a green screen,” Thorud said. “They come in and look around and then they can stand anywhere…the options are endless, in that sense. It’s like a magic trick.

In front of the green screen are director’s chairs and other props, professional cameras and a teleprompter. Lighting and audio are already configured for users. This supports the studio’s mission according to Thorud – to be accessible and inclusive while providing access to high-end equipment.

Besides the main video studio, students can go to “G-Lab” when not in use to edit with iMovie or Adobe Premiere Pro, or book a workspace in the Digital Media Lab to use these software on a dual-monitor setup. . The Digital Media Lab also offers options for those with niche film interests. Anyone can bring VHS tapes and film slides to explore digitization, and those with experience can work with a Steenback film editor.

But the RMC is home to more than film resources. Audiophiles have their fair share of options as they head to the audio studio, one of their most popular spaces. It comes equipped with three sound booths, each with two microphones, various music production tools, and computer access to Audacity, Garage Band, Logic Pro, Sound Studio, and more.

Students have already done everything from music to studio podcasts, with some projects going public. A notable example is “Song Stories”a podcast created by freshmen in conjunction with the ENWR course “American Roots Music”, published on WTJU in 2020.

A few doors down from these audio booths is the 3D printing studio, another of RMC’s top attractions. A “Star Wars” inspired Mandalorian helmet large enough to wear sits above a math project on the rack at the front of the room.

“It’s a huge range of projects, from memorabilia to costumes to art projects,” Thorud said.

This is possible thanks to the wide choice of materials and machines available. The 3D printing studio currently has seven 3D printers open for reservation, of different brands and models. Although the materials are usually expensive, students can 3D print for free after completing a dissertation. initial training session.

Further down the open space of RMC is another unique offering: two immersive virtual reality spaces. A large carpet marks the room-scale movement of each virtual space. According to Pallavi Vemuri, a college sophomore and digital media consultant, the most popular use of these VR systems is playing video games. However, the space also houses development software for those looking to get involved in the technical side.

Even when it’s time to leave RMC, there are a range of technologies available for use outside of physical space, as they offer a range of technologies for control. Everything from high-end cameras to projectors to lighting setups are open to students and staff.

Unique projects have been created by students in the past using equipment rented from RMC. The students of the basic multimedia reporting class have been created “Spring Broken: College on COVID”for example, in 2020. CIOs are also heavy users of rentals for various unique purposes.

“There was a CIO who was trying to do this project with a kind of almost surround sound,” Vemuri said. “It’s the kind of audio system where when you’re in different parts of the room, you can hear different things. So if you’re in a corner of the room you hear one thing, if you’re in a different corner of a room you hear something else, but the placement of all this equipment means that the sound doesn’t come in not in conflict with each other.

At the Robertson Media Center, the options are endless for unique creative production. No matter the interest or skill level, the third floor of the Clemons Library has the tools to turn creative dreams into reality with its plethora of creative technologies at no cost. To find out more about CMR, book on their websitetalk to reception or request a tour.

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Overland Trail Museum Celebrates Grand Opening of Print Shop and Media Center – Sterling Journal-Advocate https://saar-new-media.com/overland-trail-museum-celebrates-grand-opening-of-print-shop-and-media-center-sterling-journal-advocate/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 16:07:50 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/overland-trail-museum-celebrates-grand-opening-of-print-shop-and-media-center-sterling-journal-advocate/ Former journalist LeRoy Reitz, right, and current Journal-Advocate editor Jeff Rice examine an Intertype built by the Intertype Manufacturing Company in September 1920 for the Denver Post newspaper during the grand opening of the new printing plant and the Overland Trail Museum Media Center. Thursday September 8, 2022. It was used to decorate the weekly […]]]>

Overland Trail Museum officially unveiled its new building Thursday night with a grand opening celebration. The new Print Shop and Media Center offers visitors a chance to see various printing equipment, including a printing press and a Linotype machine, and also learn about the long history of newspapers in Logan County.

“It’s been a long time coming,” said curator Kay Rich.

The museum’s former printing press bore the brunt of the South Platte River flood in 2013 and much of the printing equipment was damaged and has not been on display since. Rich didn’t know the exact cost of restoring the equipment, but said “it was huge.”

“I have never appreciated the City and our insurance so much in my life. When the flood hit we couldn’t get into the building for about seven days and it was hot, it was September, it was hot and so everything just lay there rusty and moldy and it wasn’t. was just a nightmare,” Rich explained. “Luckily everything was restored, then we went through the process of building a building, then COVID happened, the opening was scheduled for spring 2020, COVID happened and we didn’t been able to get the sand from the sidewalks in, we took it out to bid repeatedly and everyone was so far behind it took a long time. So, we are just happy that this print shop is finally open. »

Guests at the grand opening included a few members of the Logan County Historical Society; longtime retired Logan County reporters Myron House and LeRoy Reitz; former owners and founders of the South Platte Sentinel, Delinda Korrey and Ken McDowell; former Sentinel staff and current Journal-Advocate/Sentinel staff.

Following Rich’s remarks, Benjamin Franklin, played by David C. Wood, spoke about his years in the printing business. He pointed out that most of the equipment in the museum’s print shop was very modern to him and came after his time.

Franklin worked with his father for a time in his soap and candle making business, but he hated it. Then his brother James returned from England, where he worked as a printer, and at age 12 Franklin became his apprentice to learn how to be a printer. He stayed there until he ran away at age 17.

After that, Franklin fled to Philadelphia, where he remained for the rest of his life and found a job as a printer for a Jewish man, Samuel Keimer, and helped him get his printing house in order. . They began to put out a much better product than ever before, so the Royal Governor of Pennsylvania, William Keith, came to Franklin and said he would help fund a new printing press.

Under his guidance, Franklin traveled to London to buy equipment and start a business. Keith was to write letters of recommendation and a letter of credit to purchase the press and type, paper and necessary equipment and supplies, but to Franklin’s surprise, Keith’s letters never arrived.

When he got to England he didn’t have a penny, so Franklin had to go and work with a man named Samuel Palmer, who had one of the big printing companies in London, and then he worked for John Watts, who had the largest printing press in all of London,

There, Franklin learned that he was the first American man and settler able to engrave copper plates, and he learned to cast type or create new type.

He eventually returned home, started his own printing company and eventually bought out Samuel Keimer and started publishing the Pennsylvania Gazette. Franklin made it for the first half of his life and sold it when he was 42.

Although he focused on other things later, he always had a printing press. He made two more trips to London and one to Paris and he always had a little little printing press with him so he could print stuff and post notices or make little newspapers.

Franklin, who had with him a copy of the very last Poor Richard’s Almanack he ever produced and other hand-picked productions he wrote, told the public that working in a press is not at all difficile, “the hardest thing about being a printer is setting type and being able to write upside down and upside down,” he said.

After his talk, guests watched museum staff member Zach Pomeroy demonstrate how to operate the small red printing press that is part of the exhibit. They also explored the four exhibition spaces, including a commercial machine area housing the first typewriters, an adding machine, a switchboard and more; a camera and theater area with a large collection of cameras, including early cameras, seats from the Sterling Municipal Auditorium, speakers from the Starlite drive-in and a photo collection from the official photographer of Logan County; and a third larger area filled with newspaper machines including a printing press, intertype, and tape casting.

In the children’s area, young and old tried out different forms of printing using stamps and a manual typewriter and were also able to use an old telephone.

Guests were also able to take a look at the museum’s collections storage, which is not normally open to the public, which is next to the printing press and includes the archives of the Journal-Advocate and Sentinel, and enjoy of a hamburger dinner at the High Plains Education Center.

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Satire, snark and social media are at the center of the Pennsylvania Senate race https://saar-new-media.com/satire-snark-and-social-media-are-at-the-center-of-the-pennsylvania-senate-race/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 14:39:32 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/satire-snark-and-social-media-are-at-the-center-of-the-pennsylvania-senate-race/ ERIE, Pa. — When Dr. Mehmet Oz announced last fall that he would run for the U.S. Senate as a Republican, he had an inherent advantage that most new candidates don’t have: fame. The famous TV doctor, after all, had been in many voters’ homes for years. But ever since Oz narrowly won May’s GOP […]]]>

ERIE, Pa. — When Dr. Mehmet Oz announced last fall that he would run for the U.S. Senate as a Republican, he had an inherent advantage that most new candidates don’t have: fame.

The famous TV doctor, after all, had been in many voters’ homes for years.

But ever since Oz narrowly won May’s GOP primary, his Democratic opponent has sought to make stardom his greatest political weakness.

John Fetterman, the burly 6-foot-9 Democratic Lieutenant Governor of Pennsylvania, known for his wardrobe of Carhartt sweatshirts and his arms covered in tattoos, barely fits the stereotype of a social media pundit. But his campaign has used the weapons of satire and snark on and off the internet to turn the residence and wealth of Oz into a focal point of the race, using tactics that could be cut from the writers’ room of “Veep”.

He rented a plane to fly a welcome banner over the beach in New Jersey, where Oz resided for decades before moving to Pennsylvania ahead of his Senate race. He posted videos of Garden State celebrities — including MTV’s ‘Jersey Shore’ Nicole “Snooki” Polizzi and Steven Van Zandt, a ‘Sopranos’ star and guitarist for Bruce Springsteen’s E Street Band — telling Oz to come home at home. And he invited his followers to nominate Oz for induction into the New Jersey Hall of Fame.

The trolling has turned the campaign into a daily social media fight, where candidates trade jabs in real time. And it has helped make the race – one of the most competitive and important in the country – a must-see political story of the 2022 midterms.

Fetterman “has used social media in a more provocative, novel, and creative way than what we typically see from your Republican or Democratic flag-bearer candidate,” said Syracuse University School of Information Studies professor Jennifer Stromer-Galley. who does social research. media in politics.

Oz is the near-daily subject of Fetterman’s mockery, but he himself has used video and social media effectively as a contestant despite some notable failures, building on his strong on-camera skills, Stromer said- Gallery. And his supporters say Fetterman’s tactics are questionable either way, with issues — not memes — being the driving factor in the race.

“Zero-impact comedy series,” said John Fredericks, a right-wing radio host in Pennsylvania who encouraged former President Donald Trump to back Oz, giving him a boost in a hotly contested primary. “[Fetterman] can’t campaign on issues, so he has to rely on gimmicks and stunts.

No incident better illustrates how the race plays out online than a now infamous video in which Oz slaughtered the name of a grocery store before pulling broccoli, carrots and asparagus from a shelf along with guacamole and packaged salsa. Cradling the lot in his arms, he blamed President Joe Biden for the cost of the “rawness”.

Oz said he was in “Wegners” – an apparent mix between Wegmans and Redner’s, chains popular in Pennsylvania. he later told the right-wing TV channel Newsmax he “was exhausted” after a long day of campaigning when he filmed the take.

When Oz tweeted the rawness video in April, it looked like a goof that largely flew under the radar. But from a Twitter account executed by an anonymous 22 year old who goes through the handle @umichvoter put it back into circulation in August, asking “who thought this was a good idea”, he took his own life.

Fetterman responded on Twitter, writing that in Pennsylvania, “we call it a crisper.” By the end of the week, his campaign had raised more than $1 million in small donations from the Oz video, according to campaign spokesman Joe Calvello.

In Pittsburgh, Jon Romanishin, a 57-year-old paralegal who supports Fetterman, saw the video and couldn’t resist.

“It kinda struck me that they couldn’t get the store name right,” Romanishin said. So he created a parody account on Twitter for “Wegner’s Grocery.”

It started out as a simple profile, with just the letter W for a logo. His first tweet only received 32 retweets. “It was really bad,” Romanishin said.

But in one day, a graphic designer Free a logo design, and the account – with the Twitter bio “The Crudity Capital of Central PA” – began to gain traction, earning retweets from celebrities including Jimmy Kimmel. His second tweet from August 16 went viral. Today, the account has more than 27,000 followers — including Fetterman and his wife — and frequently trolls Oz and other GOP candidates.

Plumber TJ Sandell, who is president of the Great Lakes Building and Construction Trades Council in Erie, can barely hide his smile when asked about the trolling that has partly defined the Senate race.

“He shows everyone how Dr. Oz is out of touch with the real world,” he said of Fetterman.

Erie, a town in northwestern Pennsylvania where lakeside bars dot a shoreline that overlooks jet skis and flagged fishing boats, is home to a long union tradition that has for years been synonymous with the Democratic vote. . Erie County turned blue in every presidential election between 1988 and 2012.

Then came Trump, who turned the county red by a narrow margin in 2016 before Biden won it back for Democrats in 2020. Sandell, a Democrat, says “the temperature” is different among union voters. In this year’s Senate race, he said, he expects Fetterman to be able to rally some Trump voters.

And while many here are far removed from the social media attacks that have fixed a national audience, Fetterman’s message about Oz has caught on.

“I have an objection to Oz because it doesn’t really reside in our state,” said Michelle Whalen, 59, a retired schoolteacher. “From the little bits and pieces I gathered from the TV show, I thought he was living in New York or something, not Pennsylvania.”

Terry Scheu, 64, an independent Trump voter, said he preferred Fetterman in this race. “I think Oz has bought his way” into politics.

On TV, Fetterman’s message is delivered differently from the one he tells with memes and social media mockery, though one spot shows Oz kissing his star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Fetterman’s ads target working-class voters, focusing on economic issues and portraying him as an anti-establishment figure. In one, which began airing in the Erie area in July, he mocks Washington’s decisions “made for us by people who don’t know us,” adding, “It’s exactly against who we run.

Oz accused Fetterman of being too progressive for Pennsylvania and “soft on crime”. In commercials and his frequent interviews on right-wing television, Oz calls Fetterman a “radical.” On social media, he sometimes responds to ridicule of Fetterman by ridiculing him for having taken large sums of money of his family as an adult.

Also central to Oz’s message are the attacks on Fetterman over his absence from the campaign trail. Fetterman suffered a stroke in May which sidelined him until recently. He returned to the campaign in person last month here in Erie, drawing more than 1,000 people for a rally, but he appears on the trail far less often than Oz.

Oz called Fetterman a “hologram” for campaigning virtually. And his campaign recently focused on Fetterman’s health after the Democrat said he would not participate in a debate in Pittsburgh. On Wednesday, Fetterman told Politico he would “absolutely” debate Oz.

Oz, whose campaign did not respond to questions for this story, accused Fetterman of dodging the media — and voters — because of his medical condition. Campaign aides poked fun at the Democrat’s health, at one point saying, in response to the rawness taunts, that if he had eaten more vegetables he might have avoided the stroke.

Fetterman, who said last week in his first national TV interview since the stroke that his only lingering issue was with auditory processing and speech, posted a video slamming Oz for a low blow. Fetterman was not made available for an interview for this story.

Fetterman supporter Patrick Hollingshead, a UPS driver who sits on his union’s board of directors in Harrisburg, the state capital, said the negative campaign — including some of the Democrat’s tactics — put him off. . “Why aren’t you running on your track record?” he said.

But it’s likely to only go up from here, as both candidates increase their spending on TV ads. Fetterman has been on the air for months, but Oz supporters are hoping a recent increase in Republican TV spending will help him shut down Fetterman’s. top of the polls.

David Urban, a Republican strategist who led Trump’s 2016 campaign in Pennsylvania, said the race is closer than polls suggest, in part because Oz is still bouncing back from a hard-fought primary. “Oz comes out a little bloodied and bruised, and Fetterman never had a glove on him,” he said.

For many voters, the negatives of both candidates are felt.

Christal Moore, 46, a computer scientist from Brookhaven, a suburb of Philadelphia, said when she came across the raw Oz video on Facebook, she wasn’t impressed. “I’m like, OK, what is rawness?” she says.

“I agree – food prices are high, but it would have been better to go down to the meat aisle and pull a packet of ground beef or chicken instead of complaining about the rawness,” she said . “He’s not even aware of the reality of what the daily worker goes through.”

Joe Fisher, a 55-year-old hospital director in Erie, is skeptical of Oz, largely because of the residency issue, but plans to vote for him regardless. The two-time Trump voter said he was swayed by the former president’s endorsement of Oz. “It’s pretty significant,” the Republican said. “Trump was the change.”

In Allegheny County, Republican Jane Hawkins, 66, a retired health care aide and Trump fan, says she just might not be in the Senate race.

“I don’t care about his view of letting the criminals go – too progressive for me,” she said of Fetterman. As for Oz: “It’s confusing what he really thinks,” she said, adding that he was “too famous.”

———

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GR Community Media Center Begins ‘New Chapter’ After Appointing Next Executive Director https://saar-new-media.com/gr-community-media-center-begins-new-chapter-after-appointing-next-executive-director/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 20:57:15 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/gr-community-media-center-begins-new-chapter-after-appointing-next-executive-director/ GREAT RAPIDS — The Grand Rapids Community Media Center will begin a “new chapter” under a new chief executive after months of internal divisiveness involving previous leaders. The nonprofit – which oversees the operations of WYCE-FM, the Wealthy Theatre, public-access television channel GRTV and community media outlet The Rapidian – has named Starla McDermott as […]]]>

GREAT RAPIDS — The Grand Rapids Community Media Center will begin a “new chapter” under a new chief executive after months of internal divisiveness involving previous leaders.

The nonprofit – which oversees the operations of WYCE-FM, the Wealthy Theatre, public-access television channel GRTV and community media outlet The Rapidian – has named Starla McDermott as its new executive director. She takes office on September 1.


Starla McDermott.
COURTESY PHOTO

McDermott is an outside hire for the GRCMC who previously served more than six years as Director of Development at Guiding Light Mission Inc. as he transitioned from a traditional homeless shelter to a non-profit program that helps people recover from addiction and get back to work. McDermott has also worked in the nonprofit sector with Junior Achievement of Michigan Great Lakes and the West Michigan Environmental Action Council.

GRCMC officials noted McDermott’s fundraising skills and ability to grow a donor base while serving in the nonprofit space.

“We are thrilled to welcome Starla as our new Executive Director,” GRCMC Board Chair Jason Wheeler said in a statement. “She brings an exceptional set of skills, experience and integrity that will serve our team and our organization well at this time.

“We are thrilled to begin this new chapter of the Community Media Center under Starla’s leadership. We are grateful to our team for coming together to support our ongoing commitment to creating a barrier-free resource of free speech and expression at a time when it is most needed.

McDermott takes over the GRCMC from former executive director Linda Gellasch, which has been the subject of allegations from several former GRCMC employees and board members who came forward last year with claims that lasted about six years. Specifically, the claims related to Gellasch’s direct oversight of budgets and donor relations that former employees said had been handled by GRCMC program directors in the past.

The allegations led to internal and external investigations into the organization, both of which found no wrongdoing by the leadership. An independent investigation launched last year by the GRCMC board and completed in early 2022 found no evidence of ‘board negligence or financial irregularities’ following claims by alumni staff and board members. Lawyers at Warner Norcross + Judd LLP presented the findings of the investigation verbally to the GRCMC Board of Directors, but a written report or summary was never produced in part due to concerns about possible future litigation.

Prior to the conclusion of the third-party investigation, Gellasch also said she planned to retire from the organization this summer after 20 years with the GRCMC.

Established in 1980, the GRCMC has served to provide community media on various platforms, and also provides a computer and media service center to other local non-profit organizations and community members.

“I am honored and thrilled to take on this leadership role with the Community Media Center, an organization I admired and worked with during my time at Guiding Light,” McDermott said in a statement. “Freedom of expression and access to information are essential to the success and advancement of our community, our country and our democracy.

“I wholeheartedly believe in the Community Centre’s mission to build community through media. I look forward to learning and partnering with his incredible team as we work to elevate and expand the Centre’s programming and reach.

CLARIFICATION: This story has been clarified to say that a law firm’s investigation into the management of the Grand Rapids Community Media Center has previously been presented to members of the GRCMC Board of Directors in verbal form.


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Transcript: Media Center Press Conference – Mark Rushbrook https://saar-new-media.com/transcript-media-center-press-conference-mark-rushbrook/ Sun, 07 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/transcript-media-center-press-conference-mark-rushbrook/ THE MODERATOR: Talk about the day you had as a race organization. RUSHBROOK BRAND: It was a great day, a great race. Lots of changes for lead and strength across all the different manufacturers. Especially when it counted in the end for Kevin and Stewart-Haas to get such a strong restart. And get rid of […]]]>

THE MODERATOR: Talk about the day you had as a race organization.

RUSHBROOK BRAND: It was a great day, a great race. Lots of changes for lead and strength across all the different manufacturers. Especially when it counted in the end for Kevin and Stewart-Haas to get such a strong restart. And get rid of everyone, and we also had Logano and Blaney up there. Good to see all those Fords up there.

And when it counted, Kevin went on and picked up a really convincing victory. And really important to lock him in the playoffs, but also here in our backyard for the Heritage Trophy to bring that trophy back to Dearborn.

THE MODERATOR: We’ll open it up for questions in the room. If you have one, just raise your hand. We will provide you with a microphone. We’ll start here on the left.

Q There are a lot of special elements in this victory and this performance. Does it mean more to you and Ford in general to have a guy like Kevin do this, given the season Ford and Kevin have had?

RUSHBROOK BRAND: Well, we have great teams and great drivers at every race we go to, and to have some of our drivers locked in and some fighting to get in, whether it’s Blaney or Harvick, there was a lot of pressure there- top weekend to come here, to have a good performance, to get a win.

But especially for Kevin Harvick as the champion driver of the big Stewart-Haas team, the big power Roush Yates in there, it certainly means a lot to make it today and lock him in the playoffs.

Q Is it racing that drives Ford forward, especially as the playoffs approach?

RUSHBROOK BRAND: It’s NASCAR racing. It’s a high level race, and everyone is doing their best in every race. The races have been great all season so far, and we’re going to a lot of different tracks over the next three weekends, from here to Richmond, Watkins Glen and Daytona to round out the season. regular. These are three very different tracks today.

We learned a lot today, and we will continue to learn this new car and continue to give our best every weekend.

Q Cars change. Drivers change. Except Kevin. But Ford continues to win here. You put three in the top five today. Explain why this track is your home court advantage or whatever?

RUSHBROOK BRAND: Well, there sure is a lot of extra attention when we come here from the executives of our company having all the employees here. So we’ve been spending a lot of time with the teams this week leading up to this weekend to let them know how important this is and to ask our Ford teams to work together, whether it’s a driver or team leaders.

But Doug Yates worked very hard in the engine shop. It’s definitely a power track, and he added a little something extra this weekend and definitely paid off.

THE MODERATOR: Congratulations again to you and the entire Ford camp.

RUSHBROOK BRAND: Thanks.

NASCAR PR

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Kidsburgh: Media Center helps teens discover audio storytelling https://saar-new-media.com/kidsburgh-media-center-helps-teens-discover-audio-storytelling/ Tue, 19 Jul 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/kidsburgh-media-center-helps-teens-discover-audio-storytelling/ PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — The Youth Media Center of Pittsburgh not only produces incredible teenage stories, but also prepares young people for the world of work. The teenagers are busy recording interviews, setting up their audio equipment, editing computers and creating stories for podcasts and radio in the newly renovated center. Students like Morgan McCray, a […]]]>

PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — The Youth Media Center of Pittsburgh not only produces incredible teenage stories, but also prepares young people for the world of work.

The teenagers are busy recording interviews, setting up their audio equipment, editing computers and creating stories for podcasts and radio in the newly renovated center. Students like Morgan McCray, a sophomore at Oakland Catholic High School, are learning the power of storytelling.

“It’s just amazing how these stories can impact someone,” McCray said.

She is one of 20 teenagers from 20 different schools learning to create podcasts through the RADcast program, which stands for the Regional Asset District and uses local tax money for community assets.

Larry Berger, Founder and Executive Director of SLB Radio Productions, which runs the RADcast program, said: “We also hope that, behind the scenes, kids learn about jobs they could do in the arts, and that they become patrons and advocates for the arts organizations they visit.

Kalonga Mwenda, a second year student at Baldwin High School, says, “My parents usually drive me, but it pushed me to use public transport, and it taught me about a lot of parts of the city. .”

Each student will produce several stories for a weekly podcast this fall and for The Saturday Light Brigade’s weekly radio show airing from the Youth Media Center.

Berger said the goal is to teach students not just journalism, but life skills as well.

By the end of the summer, the student will have “learned skills that will matter in any job. How do you make a call? How do you make and keep an appointment? You?”

Deanna Baringer, Director of Programs for SLB Radio Productions, says, “Telling the story is so important. Whatever career you’re heading into, knowing how to shape a narrative is a really, really powerful skill.

Jules Smalis, a rising senior at Alderdice Secondary School, discovered a passion for storytelling through the programs and plans to create her own podcasts and study communications at university.

“I think it’s a big confidence booster because it’s something I can put out into the world and say, ‘I’m proud of this and I’ve worked really hard to create this,'” said Smalis.

If you have a teenager who wants to learn more about podcasting, radio, or just storytelling, here is the link to the SLB Radio production website where you can apply for the Fall RADcast program and any other programs at the Youth Media Center.

Here is also a link in Kidsburgh, where you’ll find many other great programs for children and teens.

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Ole Miss welcomes the new director of the Student Media Center https://saar-new-media.com/ole-miss-welcomes-the-new-director-of-the-student-media-center/ Mon, 18 Jul 2022 17:28:38 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/ole-miss-welcomes-the-new-director-of-the-student-media-center/ “Everyone has a story to tell.” During his rich career, Larz Roberts continually returns to this motto, which he plans to implement as the new director of the S. Gale Denley Student Media Center at the University of Mississippi. The center, located in Bishop Hall, is home to media organizations NewsWatch Ole Miss, Rebel Radio, […]]]>

“Everyone has a story to tell.”

During his rich career, Larz Roberts continually returns to this motto, which he plans to implement as the new director of the S. Gale Denley Student Media Center at the University of Mississippi. The center, located in Bishop Hall, is home to media organizations NewsWatch Ole Miss, Rebel Radio, The Ole Miss yearbook and The Daily Mississippian.

Photo by Larz Roberts. Photo courtesy of Larz Roberts.

By assuming the role of director of SMC, Roberts marks a return to the university where he obtained his master’s degree in journalism in 1997.

Although a born storyteller, Roberts was initially unsure of his career path.

“I didn’t really know what I wanted to do until I spent a few years in a bachelor’s degree,” Roberts said. He was an undergraduate student at Florida A&M University. “My original specialty was political science. That didn’t quite convince me, and then I realized that broadcast journalism was my specialty.

Following this revelation, Roberts began to focus his attention on the world of journalism.

“I had to catch up and do a little bit of anything and everything I could do to catch up, to get that experience,” Roberts said. “I did radio. I did television. I became a bit of a jack-of-all-trades, and I continue to do so even after graduating.

This multi-faceted approach to journalistic storytelling became a key turning point in Roberts’ own ideology and remains something he encourages in those around him.

“Everything will end up online these days, no matter what your specialty, because most people come to their phones first for information,” Roberts said. “You must have some cross-pollination in your experience.”

Along with the meteoric rise of technology, cross-platform content is something Roberts strongly advocates. Journalism careers may not be as well compartmentalized as they once were, but Roberts posits that it’s ultimately for the best — for readers and creators. The diversity and mediums of storytelling, particularly at the Student Media Center, directly reflect this notion.

“I know a lot of print journalists who had to pick up rudimentary skills in audio and video recording/editing, still photography, etc. very quickly.” said Roberts. “Because now people are going to expect to see links, photos, videos – anything that will make this story real.”

Beyond the ever-changing field of technology, Roberts continues to believe in the value and integrity of storytelling, hoping to instill that passion within the various Student Media Center organizations.

“I love telling stories. I like to write stories that other people might not think of,” Roberts said. “Everyone has a story to tell. Bringing those stories together, telling those stories, getting those stories out there for a mass audience to listen to, watch, read… that appeals to me first and foremost.

Roberts previously served as a multimedia journalism instructor at Arkansas State University, faculty advisor for Red Wolf Radio and ASU-TV on campus, and president of the Arkansas College Media Association.

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Saudi ministry launches virtual media hub for 2022 Hajj season https://saar-new-media.com/saudi-ministry-launches-virtual-media-hub-for-2022-hajj-season/ Sun, 03 Jul 2022 18:42:42 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/saudi-ministry-launches-virtual-media-hub-for-2022-hajj-season/ RIYADH: Non-fungible tokens and blockchain technologies have taken the world by storm, dominating everything from the art space to advertising. Web3, a new blockchain-based version of the internet, and the metaverse are still relatively new concepts, but it looks like they’re here to stay with more and more people – and businesses – experimenting with […]]]>

RIYADH: Non-fungible tokens and blockchain technologies have taken the world by storm, dominating everything from the art space to advertising. Web3, a new blockchain-based version of the internet, and the metaverse are still relatively new concepts, but it looks like they’re here to stay with more and more people – and businesses – experimenting with them.

XGUARD, for example, is an emerging company with offices in Riyadh, Dubai and Vienna, helping organizations and individuals navigate Web3 and virtual space “one block at a time”.

In Riyadh, the company is actively holding information sessions and workshops to help equip Saudis with the skills and tools to venture into Web3, open their own wallets, invest in or sell NFTs, grow their businesses and engage in virtual experiences.

XGUARD started as a sports promotion company in Dubai. After its founder Omar Aridi began to venture into these emerging technologies, his interest in them grew.

The Saudi industry is still in its infancy, Aridi told Arab News.

He said: “I was planning to work in a very decentralized way. Saudi Arabia was not just my focus, but after reading the market and seeing how things are going, I think Saudi Arabia has the most appetite when it comes to [this space].”

Just last month, the Saudi Ministry of Tourism and the Saudi Tourism Authority created NFT souvenirs which were presented to heads of delegations attending the 116th Session of the Executive Council of the World Nations Tourism Organization Nations, held in Jeddah.

“Vision 2030 and the whole direction of digital transformation and blockchain technologies and artificial intelligence – that makes it the perfect platform for us,” Aridi said. “The only bottleneck we had was cryptocurrency regulation, which I know is on the way. I think it’s better to be the first to move now and the first to adopt. When things get regulated, we know we’ll be the go-to consulting firm here.

Since cryptocurrencies are the most commonly used form of payment in the metaverse, their lack of regulation has led companies to be wary of entering this space.

“The lack of trust comes from the lack of regulation, not the technology,” Aridi said. “You have to pay with cryptocurrency, and that’s the element that hasn’t been regulated yet.”

In the Gulf region, the UAE spearheaded NFT and cryptocurrency regulation by issuing the first cryptocurrency law and establishing the Dubai Virtual Assets Regulatory Authority.

For enterprises, enterprise NFT technologies themselves are critical. “It brings very well authenticated ownership documented on the blockchain. No one can erase it and no one can penetrate it,” Aridi said.

In some industries, having verified proof of ownership and secure data records can reduce processing time, reduce the risk of fraud and error, provide enduring product authenticity, manage critical data, and facilitate supply chain process.

Although the NFT, bitcoin and Ethereum markets are currently down due to the cryptocurrency crash, Aridi is optimistic. “It’s very good because the market has to [course] correct,” he said. “Hopefully, only the few appropriate strong value propositions will be maintained and XGUARD will be one of them, as we view NFTs as technology, not hype.”

XGUARD provides businesses with Web3 consulting, marketing, art and blockchain development, all under one roof. “In terms of competition, I don’t see anyone offering the value proposition that we offer, which is A-Z consulting solutions. No one in Saudi Arabia does that yet,” Aridi said.

For the moment, the company adopts an essentially educational approach. He has collaborated with local spaces and businesses, such as AlMashtal Creative Space in Riyadh and The Music Space in Jeddah, to create communities across the country.

“We have a lot of artists, in Saudi Arabia in particular, who really want to be heard, who really want to improve their business,” Aridi said. “For entrepreneurs, if they have an idea, we sit down with them, research it, shape it, strategize together, and help launch it. The idea is basically to create success stories.

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Montgomery Media Center baptized | New https://saar-new-media.com/montgomery-media-center-baptized-new/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 17:30:00 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/montgomery-media-center-baptized-new/ MONTGOMERY— A building that once housed a variety of media like the Vining Library on the West Virginia Institute of Technology/WVU Tech campus has been transformed into a different kind of media center. On Friday, June 24, a large crowd gathered to see the unveiling of the Montgomery Media Center by the Syner Foundation and […]]]>

MONTGOMERY— A building that once housed a variety of media like the Vining Library on the West Virginia Institute of Technology/WVU Tech campus has been transformed into a different kind of media center.

On Friday, June 24, a large crowd gathered to see the unveiling of the Montgomery Media Center by the Syner Foundation and WZTS-TV, an affiliate of COZI TV, which serves southern West Virginia. WZTS already has a base of operations at a fiber-connected Oak Hill studio, which will remain operational, representatives pointed out.

“This is an extension,” said Tommy Syner of WZTS. “It’s for the upper Kanawha Valley: Montgomery, Boomer, Smithers, Glen Ferris and up to the Gauley Bridge.

“We will cover more in this area.” In the past, the station has covered, for example, sporting events in the area involving the former Valley High School. “We’re spending more time on programs that the mayor (Greg Ingram) himself will be on, called Montgomery Today.” The overall scope of coverage will include a Shop Local segment, historical segments, general television programming, public service announcements, and community-related features and programs involving local individuals, groups, and businesses. “We feel welcome here” to “tell the stories of Montgomery and Smithers and all of the surrounding areas,” Syner said.

Among the network’s flagship programs are The Capitol Report and Doc Talk with Dr. Paul Conley. An upcoming show of the first was recorded recently at Montgomery’s studio, Ingram said.

Syner called it an “emotional” day. “It’s not about us, it’s exciting. I’ve been on TV for over 30 years, and this is the most exciting day I’ve had on TV.”

“It was an honor to be part of this community,” he continued. “Mayor Ingram was fantastic. It was a wonderful day, and we look forward to more great and wonderful days in communications to come…as part of the Montgomery Media Center.”

“I’m so grateful to be part of this community,” said Shari Syner, wife of Tommy Syner and president of the Syner Foundation.

“Shari has the vision; she understands what we’re doing,” her husband said, thanking her for her efforts behind the camera.

The main COZI television channel is channel 130, and in the UKV it is seen on channel 17. Broadcasts can currently be watched up to the Chuck Yeager Memorial Bridge in Charleston. Negotiations are underway to extend the signal, Tommy Syner said.

“It’s not just for Montgomery; it’s for the region,” Ingram said during his remarks.

Ingram thanked, among others, Senators Joe Manchin and Shelley Moore Capito for their support, as well as the support of county commissions in Kanawha and Fayette counties as the region continues its rebuilding process, the Mountaineer Challenge Academy South and Governor Jim Justice, Dan and Becky Hill, and more. He paid tribute to the Syner Foundation for its vision and for undertaking the effort to transform the Vining library.

Email: skeenan@register-herald.com or follow on Twitter @gb_scribe

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