Media center – Saar New Media http://saar-new-media.com/ Fri, 29 Oct 2021 14:45:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://saar-new-media.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-6-150x150.png Media center – Saar New Media http://saar-new-media.com/ 32 32 Women’s Media Center study: men report the news overwhelmingly in 2021 https://saar-new-media.com/womens-media-center-study-men-report-the-news-overwhelmingly-in-2021/ https://saar-new-media.com/womens-media-center-study-men-report-the-news-overwhelmingly-in-2021/#respond Fri, 29 Oct 2021 14:45:00 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/womens-media-center-study-men-report-the-news-overwhelmingly-in-2021/ Press release | Women’s Media Center Gender inequality in US newsrooms continues across all media platforms, as men overall receive 65% of signatures and news credits and women 34%, according to the latest “Divided 2021 : The Media Gender Gap ”from the Women’s Media Center. WMC researchers analyzed 62,002 content from January 1 to March […]]]>

Press release | Women’s Media Center

Gender inequality in US newsrooms continues across all media platforms, as men overall receive 65% of signatures and news credits and women 34%, according to the latest “Divided 2021 : The Media Gender Gap ”from the Women’s Media Center.

WMC researchers analyzed 62,002 content from January 1 to March 31 for 30 media across four platforms: print newspapers, online news, broadcast network and cable TV news, and news services in the United States.

According to the study, prime-time evening news shows are the most fair, while print newspapers and feeds are the least:

  • 69% of printed newspapers are written by men; 31% is written by women.
  • 63% of newswire signatures (AP and Reuters) are hung by men; 37% by women.
  • 57% of online news is written by men; 43% by women.
  • 50% of the presenters and correspondents of weekday evening TV news (cable and network) are men; 50% are women.

“The Women’s Media Center has discovered that at this time of writing, men are still dominating when reporting the news,” said Julie Burton, President and CEO of the Women’s Media Center. “Women make up more than half of the population, yet men tell most of the stories. As a result, the news media misses out on important stories, important readers and viewers, and important perspectives. The gender gap is real. We hope the industry will take this into account and implement significant changes. “

Research has found that news shows that are anchored or hosted by women tend to have more reporting by women than shows that are anchored or hosted by men. MSNBC, PBS, CBS and CNN all had more than 50% female:

  • MSNBC’s “The ReidOut” with host Joy Reid: 70% female, 30% male.
  • PBS “NewsHour”, where Judy Woodruff is presenter and editor-in-chief: 66% female, 34% male.
  • CBS “Evening News”, where Norah O’Donnell is the presenter and editor: 61% female, 39% male.
  • CNN’s “Erin Burnett OutFront”: 53% female, 47% male.
  • The exception is “The Story” by Fox News, with host Martha MacCallum: 39% female; 61% men.
  • Of the seven news shows, ABC’s World News Tonight, hosted by David Muir, had the fewest women at 28%.

“We are encouraged by the encouraging figures in this report regarding the information released,” said WMC Board Chair Janet Dewart Bell. “Yet there is so much work to be done if we are to achieve true equality and inclusion in the media. Everyone wins when media executives expand the possibilities to include women as sources, presenters, hosts, correspondents and in all news positions.

News organizations must be held accountable for persistent disparities and inequalities in the media, said Gloria Steinem, co-founder of the WMC. “Women must be visible and powerful in all aspects of the media for American society to ever be a true democracy. “

WMC’s analysis also found that in the print media industry, none of the 14 news organizations examined had achieved gender parity in author credits. The biggest gender gap was at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, where men wrote 84% and women 16% of news articles. The narrowest gaps were at The New York Times and The Washington Post, where, for each, men wrote 59% and women 41% of the articles, and USA Today with 61% men and 39% women.

Of the seven Internet news sites examined, the largest gender gap was that of MSNBC, where men wrote 88% of the articles and women wrote 12%. The narrowest gap was at Vox, where women wrote 50%, men 47%, and non-binary journalists wrote 3% of the articles. Women had more signatures than men on CNN.com, HuffPost and Vox.

In an extraordinary year of news and media coverage – on COVID-19, race, politics, media and other critical concerns – men have also dominated on these topics:

  • 63% of electoral coverage was carried out by men; 37% by women.
  • 59% of international and political media coverage was done by men; 41% by women.
  • 54% of COVID-19 coverage was by men; 46% by women.
  • 53% of racial justice coverage was by men; 47% by women.
  • 50% of social justice coverage was provided by men; 50% by women.

In addition, men dominate coverage of sports, weather, law, opinion and editorials, business and economics, and science and the environment.

The research “Divided 2021: The Media Gender Gap” was conducted by WMC Media Lab and Lake Research Partners. For the first time, cable TV news has been included in this regular WMC analysis. WMC, which produced six previous Divided reports, changed its search period from September 1 to November 30 of the previous year to the start of the research publication year. He also adjusted the list of newspapers printed to reflect changes in circulation figures and to include newsrooms in areas of the country that had not previously been examined in Divided reports. The content included articles of at least 500 words and TV news transcripts. For the full methodology, click here.

The Women’s Media Center, co-founded by Jane Fonda, Robin Morgan and Gloria Steinem, is an inclusive feminist organization that strives to increase the visibility, sustainability and decision-making power of women and girls in the media to ensure that their stories are told and their voices are heard. We do this by performing media research through the WMC Media Lab; create and model original online and on-air journalism; train women and girls to be effective in the media; and promote women experts in all fields through WMC SheSource.

WMC’s online and live journalism channels include the award-winning podcast and radio show WMC Live with Robin Morgan, WMC Features, WMC Women Under Siege, WMC FBomb, WMC IDAR / E, WMC Climate and WMC Speech Project.

Click here for the report “WMC Divided 2021: The Media Gender Gap”.


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Cloud Media Center (CMC) Gets Original Athlete-Focused Sports Content Through Partnership with CampusLore | Business and finance https://saar-new-media.com/cloud-media-center-cmc-gets-original-athlete-focused-sports-content-through-partnership-with-campuslore-business-and-finance/ https://saar-new-media.com/cloud-media-center-cmc-gets-original-athlete-focused-sports-content-through-partnership-with-campuslore-business-and-finance/#respond Thu, 21 Oct 2021 14:10:36 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/cloud-media-center-cmc-gets-original-athlete-focused-sports-content-through-partnership-with-campuslore-business-and-finance/ PONTE VEDRA, Florida – (BUSINESS WIRE) – October 21, 2021– Cloud media center (CMC) has partnered with CampusLore, a sports content and production company providing unlimited access to current and retired professional athletes, including the most famous NFL and NBA players. CMC, headquartered in Ponte Vedra, Florida, sells ad inventory connected to long and short […]]]>

PONTE VEDRA, Florida – (BUSINESS WIRE) – October 21, 2021–

Cloud media center (CMC) has partnered with CampusLore, a sports content and production company providing unlimited access to current and retired professional athletes, including the most famous NFL and NBA players.

CMC, headquartered in Ponte Vedra, Florida, sells ad inventory connected to long and short sports video content through a cloud-based, analytics-based distribution platform that seamlessly connects advertisers to producers and publishers of content.

Through a partnership with CampusLore, CMC’s in-depth access to professional athletes delivers unique, star-rated content and a full suite of related advertising inventories, such as signage, pre-roll inserts, sponsorships and personalized product placement.

CMC will provide advertisers and publishers with a rich library of interviews and pro-athlete articles as well as over 100 original pieces of fresh weekly sports content, including game highlights, game information and more .

“CMC’s partnership with CampusLore opens the door to a range of content featuring the athletes that sport-focused advertisers and publishers need to succeed in an increasingly competitive digital marketplace,” said the president of CMC, Robert Portrie. “We have the funding, the experience and the vision, a world-class technology platform and a unique revenue-sharing business model that will allow us to compete with anyone in the space.”

CampusLore, affiliated with the Brandr Group, was founded in 2017 in partnership with the NFL Players Association. CampusLore produces custom football, basketball and other sports content featuring top academics now playing as professionals in major US sports leagues.

“Our mission at CampusLore is to empower athletes to tell their stories, and our new partnership with CMC allows us to share those stories with a wider audience through a wider range of advertisers and editors,” said Lee Bushkell. , president of CampusLore. “Our personalized content is perfectly suited to CMC’s innovative distribution platform, bringing added value to all players and offering unique advertising opportunities in this crowded competitive space.

CMC’s end-to-end platform enables collaboration, on an unprecedented level, between the three large groups traditionally siled within the digital publishing market – content producers, advertisers and publishers. It is this collaboration combined with the best personalized dashboards and real-time analytics that enables these three groups to optimize their campaigns with speed and granular precision.

“We’ve built the whole package, an end-to-end platform with powerful next-generation technology capabilities,” said Ravi Bandaru, CTO of CMC. “CMC’s one-of-a-kind digital media platform, powered by AI / ML analytics and with a robust and secure AWS cloud service backend, will be the go-to media network for all content producers, publishers and advertisers to meet all of their business needs.

CMC offers advertisers unlimited access to hundreds of high-quality sports-focused videos in a rich, fully sortable library with well-defined content categories and keyword search functionality.

“With CMC’s personalized dashboard,” said Jay Handline, president of CMC, “advertisers can select the videos they want, insert their ad slots – pre-roll, mid-roll, post-roll – and our national network of publishers distribute the ads. has added content to tens of millions of micro-targeted sports-loving consumers. The result is increased click-through and conversion rates for advertisers.

In addition to traditional ad insertions, advertisers can create original and branded content through a comprehensive process: CMC and CampusLore will take care of recruiting talent, managing all production and managing distribution. When it comes to creating this bespoke, high-value content, CMC offers its customers industry-leading payment packages.

Cloud Media Center (CMC), based in Ponte Vedra, Fla., Sells digital advertising inventory through a cloud-based distribution and analytics platform that seamlessly connects advertisers to content providers and publishers. The result maximizes collaboration – unleashing synergies of next-level advertising campaigns. CMC’s next-generation platform and best-in-class dashboards, created by former Intel developers, provide front-end AI-based microtargeting and easy-to-understand real-time analytics on the backend. Content producers, advertisers and publishers will have all the tools and data they need to optimize campaigns, and do it quickly and accurately. Visit the CMC website here.

CONTACT: Peter Wendel, media contact

KEYWORD: FLORIDA UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA

INDUSTRY KEYWORD: BASEBALL ADVERTISING COMMUNICATION SPORTS FOOTBALL AUDIO / VIDEO TECHNOLOGY

SOURCE: Cloud Media Center

Copyright Business Wire 2021.

PUB: 10/21/2021 10:10 a.m. / DISC: 10/21/2021 10:10 a.m.

Copyright Business Wire 2021.


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USM organizes an open day for an expanded student multimedia center https://saar-new-media.com/usm-organizes-an-open-day-for-an-expanded-student-multimedia-center/ https://saar-new-media.com/usm-organizes-an-open-day-for-an-expanded-student-multimedia-center/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/usm-organizes-an-open-day-for-an-expanded-student-multimedia-center/ Fri, 08/10/2021 – 9:55 am | By: Van Arnold “The voice of the students resonates through time and space. That’s what Dr. Edgar Simpson, director of the University of Southern Mississippi (USM) School of Communication, believes in stressing the importance of the new student media center on the Hattiesburg campus. “The Student Media Center amplifies, […]]]>

Fri, 08/10/2021 – 9:55 am | By: Van Arnold

“The voice of the students resonates through time and space.

That’s what Dr. Edgar Simpson, director of the University of Southern Mississippi (USM) School of Communication, believes in stressing the importance of the new student media center on the Hattiesburg campus.

“The Student Media Center amplifies, helps shape and commemorates the rhythm of generations,” said Simpson. “Without this noise of change, there are fewer of us as a university community.”

After a year of major restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Simpson and his colleagues are excited to host an open house for the Student Media Center on Wednesday, October 13. The first session will be held from 4:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. 3 p.m. for professors and administrators, followed by a session from 6 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. for students.

Sessions will begin at Stout Hall with an overview of the Center, explaining why this is important and what projects faculty and staff are undertaking. The program will also include a tour of the Student Media Center facilities at College Hall. Note the launch of SMTV, a weekly news program produced by students.

“The open house is designed to introduce and familiarize the college community to all of the opportunities available,” said Simpson. “While USM has always had a vibrant student media presence, we have spent the year of the virus planning and developing what we do. The goal is that every USM student who wants to create media, sell advertising, launch a PR campaign, dive into social media, etc., can do so in the Student Media Center.

Simpson points out that SMTV has been in discussion for some time. USM has a long history of offering broadcast and media production programs, but did not have a regular / routine outlet for students to practice and hone what they were learning in the areas of video, sound. and television.

“We are doing this in a converged environment, which reflects what our students will see in the media industries,” said Simpson. “Convergence is the idea that our students will be asked to perform a variety of tasks, from writing to making videos to creating graphics. With the addition of SMTV, the Student Sales Team and the Creative Division, students can see how information, creative work, and advertising can work across all platforms, from social media to the newspaper to the side. through the radio, the internet, the new show and even iterations that we can’t yet figure out.

To learn more about the USM School of Communication, call 601.266.4258 or visit https://www.usm.edu/communication/index.php.


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Could the Five Points Media Center become a hub for Denver’s next black cultural renaissance? https://saar-new-media.com/could-the-five-points-media-center-become-a-hub-for-denvers-next-black-cultural-renaissance/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/could-the-five-points-media-center-become-a-hub-for-denvers-next-black-cultural-renaissance/ Longtime Denver artist, musician and activist Jeff Campbell wants to spark a black cultural renaissance in his old neighborhood: Five Points. Is it still possible? Take a walk down Welton Street. The neighborhood was once the heart of “Black Denver” and historically dubbed “the Harlem of the West”. Much like Harlem, Five Points has been […]]]>

Longtime Denver artist, musician and activist Jeff Campbell wants to spark a black cultural renaissance in his old neighborhood: Five Points.

Is it still possible?

Take a walk down Welton Street. The neighborhood was once the heart of “Black Denver” and historically dubbed “the Harlem of the West”. Much like Harlem, Five Points has been the scene of massive development, and many elders – unable to keep up with and raise property taxes and rent increases – have been moving away for decades.

Of course, there’s a lot of booming nostalgia in the city’s brass for the touring jazz culture that once took root there. These sugar-coated tributes too often overlook the fact that the culture grew out of Denver’s long legacy of racism and segregation. The story is brutal: White-only downtown hotels refused to allow legends like Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong to stay at their establishments, so they boarded – and performed late-night concerts – to Five Points instead.

Since the mid-19th century much of the region’s black culture has been forgotten. City boosters pay hardly any homage to the rise of late 90s and early 2000s hip-hop in the region when Campbell, who made waves nationwide by rapping as the Apostle, builds the Hip-Hop Coalition and inspired a generation of young artists. Even longtime resident and cultural maven Ashara Ekundayo, a local legend behind the spoken word series Cafe Nuba, found a new home in Oakland, where she opened the Ashara Ekundayo Gallery, A few years ago.

There are still signs of black culture in Five Points: activist and media producer Jeff Fard maintains Brother Jeff Cultural Center on Welton; the Welton Street Cafe – although threatened by the pandemic – continues to serve food for the soul; and the Five point jazz festival brings live music to a part of town where jazz is now largely dead.

Kevin J. Beaty

As for current artists: Many of those who grew up at Five Points live far from the neighborhood. Jam bands, New York-style bagels and craft breweries make up Welton Street culture more than long-stranded jazz spots like the Rainbow Room and the Rossonian.

The questions Campbell will face as he tries to breathe new life into the neighborhood’s black culture: Can he find a space in the neighborhood that won’t be redeveloped into apartments and condos? And if so, who is left to participate and who can they withdraw and how?

Part of Campbell’s strategy to spark this revival of Five Points Black is to mobilize support to buy a Denver landmark: the four-story brick building at 2900 Welton Street.

There, he wanted to create a collaborative workspace for media, artistic and cultural groups led by BIPOC, a space for media workshops and a newsroom for his militant project Des alliés aux abolitionnistes and his Emancipation Theater Company.

His vision echoes the recent history of the building, where multiple non-profit media projects have taken root over the past thirty years.

2907 Welton Street.  August 12, 2021.
Kevin J. Beaty / Denverite

The story of the Five Points Media Center

The building at 2900 Welton Street was constructed in 1921; for years it housed the Honey Bread bakery. By the early 1990s, the building had been abandoned along with much of Welton Street.

Then, in 1992, a group of media activists bought the building and moved into it, dubbing it the Five Points Media Center. The space housed huge dreams. Women and people of color, long excluded from corporate media, would finally have a dedicated place in Denver to receive journalism training. Denver’s often overlooked or misrepresented neighborhood, could take control of its own history and develop its power through telecommunications and radio.

In two years, Jazz station KUVO and PBS12 had moved into the building, along with Denver Community Television – better known as DCTV.

The Five Points Media Center did a good run. But in 2005, the city council – discouraged by DCTV’s finances – decided to deny juice to the organization, and public access eventually shifted across the city under new management through Denver Open Media.

In the years that followed, the national progressive television network Free speech television moved into the Five Points Media Center. In 2020, KUVO – which merged with Rocky Mountain PBS in 2013 – moved into new Buell Community Media Center. And with COVID-19, tenants at the Five Points Media Center were largely working from home. Even parts of the building that were not technically vacant were largely empty.

What is the future of the building and will Channel 12 stay there?

The second floor of the building, where KUVO lived, has been for sale for several years without a buyer. PBS12, which occupies the first floor, is uncertain about its future direction. The channel is changing and preparing to welcome a new CEO, Kristen Blessman, the former president of the Colorado Women’s Chamber of Commerce.

“It starts October 18,” said Kim Carver, vice chairman of the board, interim CEO and general manager. “From there we’ll start talking about what our real options look like. At the moment, it’s business as usual.

Should the station stay or go?

“It’s a big old building,” Carver says. “It’s in a beautiful part of town. We really like it. There are a lot of options.

“Honestly, we have no plans,” adds Mark Seewald, PBS12 mainstay, vice president of operations at the station. “There is no indication from anyone that we are planning to move. There is no indication of anyone we plan to sell. We plan to explore different options. We are currently in the options exploration stage. The new boss, when she presents herself in a few weeks, she may have some ideas herself.

Although PBS12 is uncertain about the future of the building – which is ominously described as “Five Points Media Center Condos” in city records, suggesting it could turn into another high density housing project. on Welton Street – Campbell’s vision is clear: center in a hub for Denver’s black cultural revival.

Jeff Campbell stands outside the Five Points Media Center, 2900 Welton Street, October 5, 2021.
Kevin J. Beaty / Denverite

But is Campbell’s dream really achievable?

“I wouldn’t say it’s pie in the sky or anything solid,” Seewald says. “It’s somewhere in between.”

Campbell himself can no longer afford to live at Five Points. In 2016, he left his apartment above Coffee at the tip, where he had lived since 2008. The percentage of neighborhood residents who were black had declined, but by 2012, after Colorado legalized recreational marijuana, he recalls, the neighborhood’s character quickly changed.

From 2010 to 2020, Five Points’ black population declined from 16% to 10%, according to US census data.

“I’ve seen gentrification happen,” he says. “When Amendment 64 was passed I saw it speed up exponentially – speed up by ten… The whole vibe of the community changed completely. I started to feel alienated in my own community, where the other tenants who lived in the building now – the white tenants – didn’t want to leave the door open for me. Even with a key ring, they would ask me, ‘do you live here? “”

Now he lives in Glendale, where he is learning to appreciate rugby and the home side, the Merlins.

“I would much prefer to be back in Points,” he said.

Taking over the Five Points Media Center, which he plans to call “The Renaissance”, would be a kind of homecoming.

Here’s how Campbell plans to complete the acquisition.

Raising the money to buy the building is not going to be easy.

Campbell received a small amount of funding from the Bonfils-Stanton Foundation pay for a business plan. He contracted with a business consultant, lawyer and real estate agent to try to figure out how to buy the building.

They have already filed a letter of intent to buy the second floor from its owner, Rocky Mountain PBS, he said, noting that this floor will cost around $ 2 million. Once PBS12’s new CEO gets a foothold, he hopes to be able to secure the rest of the building within eighteen months for $ 8.5 million.

“The KUVO floor is ready to roll,” he says. “But the whole building could possibly go online in eighteen months. This is what we are aiming for.

He posted articles about his aspirations on Facebook, drawing encouragement from a who’s-who of Denver’s black cultural scene, including Fard, who runs a regular interview show from Brother Jeff’s Cultural Center just down the street. rue, and DJ and filmmaker Musa Bailey, the former co-owner of hip-hop art bar Cold Crush.

If things work out, Campbell imagines there will be plenty of organizations willing to lease space to create media using some of the tools previous companies have left behind: green screens, mixers and more. .

“All the equipment is there,” said Campbell. “It’s turnkey. It’s literally: turn on the lights, turn on the mixer, turn on the mics, and mute a podcast right away.

The income from the tenants would be used to fund educational programs for young people and possibly a media artist residency. All of these projects sharing space and harnessing the history and technology still present in the building would form a creative incubator – and revitalize black culture in the neighborhood.

“It’s like hip-hop,” says Campbell. “It’s old technology that most people ignore and throw away – or tear down the walls and do something else with it …

“We can find new ways to use this infrastructure – this great old-fashioned infrastructure – to do really creative and interesting things in collaboration with other creatives,” he continues. “The potential is endless if we just imagine what it can be rather than throwing away the old buildings or the old technology or the old approaches. “


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Texere launches Online Media Center, continuing its first digital mission https://saar-new-media.com/texere-launches-online-media-center-continuing-its-first-digital-mission/ https://saar-new-media.com/texere-launches-online-media-center-continuing-its-first-digital-mission/#respond Tue, 14 Sep 2021 15:27:09 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/texere-launches-online-media-center-continuing-its-first-digital-mission/ Texere Publishing Limited has launched a new online multimedia center, which showcases its wide range of creative services and advertising products. Marketing Technology News: EY Announces Alliance With Snowflake To Leverage Their Data Cloud Solutions For Business Across … Located on the Texere Publishing website under the heading “Advertising and Services”, the new media center […]]]>

Texere Publishing Limited has launched a new online multimedia center, which showcases its wide range of creative services and advertising products.

Marketing Technology News: EY Announces Alliance With Snowflake To Leverage Their Data Cloud Solutions For Business Across …

Located on the Texere Publishing website under the heading “Advertising and Services”, the new media center will become an essential resource for existing and potential customers, bringing together details of the full range of products and services offered by Texere – from opportunities from magazine and print advertising to personalized, integrated and multi-channel campaigns. Texere fully understands the importance of having easy access to the right information and is confident that customers will find the new media center invaluable.

The Media Center replaces Texere’s traditional media kits and provides an up-to-date platform for its growing brand and product portfolios. The center also fuels Texere’s ongoing digital first drive, which began in 2019 with the launch of new websites for all of its brands.

“The introduction of our media center means our business can be more responsive than ever, both to the changing demands of our partners and to the quicksand of modern media,” said Richard Hodson, Commercial Director at Texere Publishing. “The Media Center is the new home for our expanding product and brand portfolio, acting as a one-stop – and, most importantly, up-to-date – destination for our international clientele. We look forward to feedback from new and existing customers.

To coincide with the launch of its media center, Texere will also introduce a monthly marketing newsletter. Freely accessible to all, the newsletter will include information from experts from and to marketers on the latest trends, opportunities and industry advancements.

Marketing Technology News: Oracle Reports First Quarter Fiscal 2022 Financial Results


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GHC Students Test New Multimedia Center on Floyd County Campus | Education https://saar-new-media.com/ghc-students-test-new-multimedia-center-on-floyd-county-campus-education/ https://saar-new-media.com/ghc-students-test-new-multimedia-center-on-floyd-county-campus-education/#respond Mon, 13 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/ghc-students-test-new-multimedia-center-on-floyd-county-campus-education/ This fall, Georgia Highlands College will inaugurate its new Media Innovation Center, home to a variety of writing and media related activities. The MIC brings together in one location facilities for the Writing Center, Film Study Room, the “Old Kimono” student comic, the “Six Mile Post” student newspaper and the “Student Spin” student podcast. It’s […]]]>

This fall, Georgia Highlands College will inaugurate its new Media Innovation Center, home to a variety of writing and media related activities.

The MIC brings together in one location facilities for the Writing Center, Film Study Room, the “Old Kimono” student comic, the “Six Mile Post” student newspaper and the “Student Spin” student podcast. It’s in the McCorkle building on the Floyd County campus, next to the bookstore.

MIC’s multi-area advisor Allison Hattaway said the ultimate goal of the new center is to give GHC students a place where they can connect and create.

“We want students from all walks of life – not just journalism or film – to come and learn how to use standard software to make their dreams come true,” Hattaway said.

Many renovations have been made to the space. There is an open lobby with a lounge and a desk for the editor and editor of the Six Mile Post. Specific rooms are also set up for students working on the cinema and the Old Kimono.

But perhaps the biggest addition to the Innovation Center is a recording studio for the Student Spin.

“The podcast booth is probably what excites me the most, and I think a lot of students get excited when they see it,” Hattaway said.

Student Spin and Six Mile Post staff members got a first look at the layout over the weekend and had the opportunity to test drive the equipment they will be working with this semester.

Newly announced Six Mile Post editor Russell Chesnut said the improved office would help them work better as a team.

“We are able to connect all of our devices together and collaborate,” he said. “Having the big TV allows us to have meetings and show anyone what we need to show them. “


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GHC opens new media center, ‘the MIC’ | Education https://saar-new-media.com/ghc-opens-new-media-center-the-mic-education/ https://saar-new-media.com/ghc-opens-new-media-center-the-mic-education/#respond Tue, 07 Sep 2021 18:48:00 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/ghc-opens-new-media-center-the-mic-education/ Georgia Highlands College recently opened the college’s new Media Innovation Center or “the MIC” on the Floyd campus. The new area is home to space for the Six Mile Post student newspaper, the newspaper’s Student Spin Podcast, the Old Red Kimono literary magazine, and the Floyd Campus Writing Center. The MIC also has a studio […]]]>

Georgia Highlands College recently opened the college’s new Media Innovation Center or “the MIC” on the Floyd campus.

The new area is home to space for the Six Mile Post student newspaper, the newspaper’s Student Spin Podcast, the Old Red Kimono literary magazine, and the Floyd Campus Writing Center. The MIC also has a studio for GHC film programs.

The MIC opened its doors this fall in the David B. McCorkle building.

All students will have access to the MIC and can schedule a time to use industry standard technology and software to help with classroom and personal projects.

“We want to help students facilitate any media-related idea or project they are working on,” said Acting Dean of Humanities Jessica Lindberg.

Six Mile Post and old red kimono

As the SMP grew in terms of connecting with students – online, in print, and through the Student Spin podcast – a renovated space was essential.

“This new space is very open, modern and technologically updated,” said Allison Hattaway, SMP educational advisor. “I hope the new office layout will help students feel more comfortable so that they really feel like this is their space. “

The new space will also enable community engagement, providing a central location to observe the operations of the Six Mile Post, the Student Spin and the Old Red Kimono, which could lead to greater networking opportunities for students.

“We would eventually like to have guest speakers and local media representatives to watch the students work in this new collective space,” Hattaway said.

Movie

Although the GHC Film Program just launched in fall 2020, students are already doing internships, including professional film production.

Through MIC and its film studio, School of Humanities President Seth Ingram said the college will be able to attract more film productions to the northwest Georgia region, creating more opportunities for students to gain practical experience.

Offering courses in film production and film studies, students can gain hands-on experience working with industry tools and equipment. In addition, students of all study programs will be able to arrange to have access to this equipment for their academic, professional and personal activities.

“The goal is to make the MIC an all-inclusive resource for our students, but one that will also house the Film program,” Ingram said.

Writing center & collaboration

One of the missions of the MIC is to provide transversal assistance to students. As the new headquarters of the GHC Writing Center, students will have access to additional help to become more effective communicators.

Led by English instructor Shannan Harrington, the Writing Center will help students better approach writing assignments by guiding them through the areas of brainstorming, describing, researching, reviewing and reviewing. grammar.

“From start-up help in English to helping graduates with their cover letters and resumes, the writing center will help students with whatever they need in terms of writing help,” Harrington said.

Hattaway said hosting these student publications alongside the Writing Center and Film Program would help give all students a chance to diversify and explore new opportunities on campus to grow as a student. students and as individuals.

“A lot of times students may think, ‘I’m not a strong writer, so I don’t belong in a journal,’ or, ‘I’m shy, so I don’t belong in a podcast program,’ Hattaway said. “We want all students to have a place at the MIC.


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Writing and Media Center to Host Wellness Retreat | New https://saar-new-media.com/writing-and-media-center-to-host-wellness-retreat-new/ https://saar-new-media.com/writing-and-media-center-to-host-wellness-retreat-new/#respond Tue, 31 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/writing-and-media-center-to-host-wellness-retreat-new/ The Iowa State Writing and Media Center will host a writing and wellness retreat on Friday at the Hixson-Lied Student Success Center. Jordan Maurice / Iowa State Daily The Iowa State Writing and Media Center will host a student writing and wellness retreat on Friday. “This is a great opportunity for students to have a […]]]>






The Iowa State Writing and Media Center will host a writing and wellness retreat on Friday at the Hixson-Lied Student Success Center.



The Iowa State Writing and Media Center will host a student writing and wellness retreat on Friday.

“This is a great opportunity for students to have a free session to focus on their well-being and set writing goals,” said Rachel McKenny, associate director of the Writing and Media Center.

The retreat will be held from 9 am to noon at Hixson-Lied 0060. A breakfast of fruit and coffee will also be offered from 8:30 am.

The retreat will help graduate and undergraduate students develop their writing and wellness skills.

“The retreat will include brief presentations on how to manage stress, increase productivity and create a sustainable work / life balance,” McKenny said.

McKenny said students will learn self-care and academic achievement tips during the session.

Students can register for the retreat on the Writing and Media Center website website.

Event registration will remain open until Friday, but attendees must register by 5:00 p.m. Wednesday to be included in the food count.

The Writing and Media Center will host several other retirement opportunities this semester. More information on upcoming events can be found at the center website.


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Newspapers, media focus of the Gallery Walk discussion | Local News https://saar-new-media.com/newspapers-media-focus-of-the-gallery-walk-discussion-local-news/ https://saar-new-media.com/newspapers-media-focus-of-the-gallery-walk-discussion-local-news/#respond Fri, 06 Aug 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/newspapers-media-focus-of-the-gallery-walk-discussion-local-news/ BRATTLEBORO – A multimedia exhibit celebrating publishing in Brattleboro kicked off on Friday with a forum featuring a discussion of the current state of newspapers. “Brattleboro has been lucky,” said Randy Holhut, associate editor of The Commons, a nonprofit weekly published in the city since 2006. “You don’t know how close this town came to […]]]>

BRATTLEBORO – A multimedia exhibit celebrating publishing in Brattleboro kicked off on Friday with a forum featuring a discussion of the current state of newspapers.

“Brattleboro has been lucky,” said Randy Holhut, associate editor of The Commons, a nonprofit weekly published in the city since 2006. “You don’t know how close this town came to being. newspaper. “

In 2016, a group of investors based in the Berkshires, western Massachusetts, bought the Reformer from Digital First Media, which was itself controlled by Alden Capital, a hedge fund described by Vanity Fair as “a vampire. which bleeds the newspapers blank ”.

The partnership, New England Newspapers Inc., acquired the Reformer, Bennington Banner, Manchester Journal and its flagship product, The Berkshire Eagle, in Pittsfield, Mass., And stabilized the four newspapers after years of cuts that have resulted in decreased coverage. Earlier this year, Paul Belogour, a software entrepreneur who moved to the area from Boston in 2008, purchased the three southern Vermont properties under the umbrella of Vermont News and Media.

Jeff Potter, editor of The Commons, said this area “is just a fantastic place to produce a journal. There is no better place than Brattleboro to get all of the problems we face socially, economically and politically. It is a small town while being social.

He also noted, “with the highest degree of respect and appreciation for voices that are somewhat out of the ordinary”, the region is populated by a disproportionate number of “fascinating bizarre”.

“One Town, Many Voices: News and Book Publishing in Brattleboro Over Time,” at 118 Elliot Street, is inspired by the new book “Print Town: Brattleboro’s Legacy of Words,” a look at Brattleboro’s long history and continuing legacy of printing and editing, plus audio story scores created by community members for the all-new Brattleboro Words Trail.

The exhibit was curated by Rolf Parker, Jacqueline Hooper and Lissa Weinmann, and features portraits and headers from Brattleboro’s first newspaper – “Federal Galaxy” by Benjamin Smead. The history of Brattleboro includes Clarina Howard Nichols, one of the nation’s earliest newspaper editors, and Howard C. Rice, who began publishing the Reformer as a daily in 1913 since its inception as a weekly in 1876. .

The exhibit also celebrates the 15-year history of The Commons, one of the first weekly newspapers in the United States to adopt a non-profit model.

Chris Lenois, former host of Green Mountain Mornings on WTSA and current president of Brattleboro Community Television, moderated the Friday night forum, which was part of Gallery Walk.

Lenois, who got his start in journalism writing sports reports for the Reformer, grew up in Vernon and attended Brattleboro Union High School.

“I’m just a news junkie,” he said. “I appreciate the coverage we have here in this community and the blessings of two print media, community radio and community television. It is really important that we continue to support all of these entities.

Along with Holhut and Potter, the panel included Melanie Winters, editor-in-chief of The Reformer, Gena Mangiaratti, arts and entertainment editor-in-chief for Vermont News and Media, and Miles Anton, high school student and aspiring journalist who hosts, along with Jonah Bingham, Climax Hour radio show on WVEW, Brattleboro’s community radio station.

“Journalism has to be an institution,” said Anton, especially at a time when it is becoming increasingly difficult to discern opinion from fact.

Holhut, who came to Brattleboro in 1989 to work for Norm Runnion at the Reformer and then left for The Commons in 2010, said he came to town when the Reformer had around 100 people working there, with an office in Bellows Falls, five reporters in Brattleboro and a proofreader.

Everything changed with the advent of the Internet and hedge funds to maximize profits.

“So many newspapers are owned by financial interests that have no absolute interest in journalism,” Holhut said.

“Brattleboro is lucky to have two newspapers,” said Winters, who got her first journalism job in 1989, which she called the “end of the heyday” of newspapers before the arrival of Internet and hedge funds.

“We have challenges,” she said. “Part of this is that we have to do a better job of letting people know that they need us. Studies have shown that communities with newspapers… have greater civic involvement, less corruption, lower taxes, and better bond ratings.

And while the internet has increased the amount of information available to the public, Holhut said, it has also increased the amount of disinformation.

“There have always been cranks and idiots and people pushing things,” he said. “The problem is, it’s faster now. A little misinformation can go around the world before you find out it’s wrong.

He said newspapers and other traditional media sources can serve as news curators, to filter out disinformation.

“Online it’s like a fire hose,” Holhut said. “A newspaper helps turn down the tap so you can drink without breaking your teeth. “

“An essential part of the process is fact-checking,” Potter said, adding that it is also the responsibility of a newspaper to sort out disinformation and agenda-driven news.

For example, he struggled to present an event presented as information about the ill effects of Critical Race Theory, which Potter says has been “militarized” as right-wing propaganda.

Instead of just releasing the press release as it was submitted to The Commons, Potter included information from the Brookings Institute and Media Matters to explain exactly what Critical Race Theory is.

“It’s not about trying to force a different opinion,” he said. “It means there are lines in the sand. If that’s just not true, I don’t put it in the journal. It has nothing to do with your position on the political spectrum. “

Mangiaratti said social media is both a boon and a bane for newspapers.

“It can be very helpful,” she said. “It’s a good way for me to communicate with people. “

It also allows it to disseminate information about events and arts and entertainment on the Internet while focusing on in-depth stories for the print edition.

“I try to focus on the human stories,” she said. “I talk to them and find out what motivates them. “

Friday’s conversation was recorded by BCTV. To view the conversation, click here.


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Emmys: TV Academy and CBS Nix Media Center, and Will Limit Red Carpet https://saar-new-media.com/emmys-tv-academy-and-cbs-nix-media-center-and-will-limit-red-carpet/ https://saar-new-media.com/emmys-tv-academy-and-cbs-nix-media-center-and-will-limit-red-carpet/#respond Fri, 06 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/emmys-tv-academy-and-cbs-nix-media-center-and-will-limit-red-carpet/ TV Academy reveals more plans for this year’s Emmy TV broadcast and safety protocols in light of the COVID-19 pandemic and the contagious new delta variant. The organization just announced that a red carpet will only be held during the Primetime Emmys on September 19, and not during the creative arts ceremonies the weekend before. […]]]>

TV Academy reveals more plans for this year’s Emmy TV broadcast and safety protocols in light of the COVID-19 pandemic and the contagious new delta variant. The organization just announced that a red carpet will only be held during the Primetime Emmys on September 19, and not during the creative arts ceremonies the weekend before. In addition, this mat will be limited to a handful of outlets. Most of the media will be responsible for virtually covering the Emmys at home, as there will not be an on-site media center yet this year.

Here’s the latest update from the Academy and CBS:

As a precaution and for the safety of Emmy nominees, guests, and the media, production and staff numbers should be limited at this year’s 73rd Emmy Awards.

Therefore, there will be a very limited red carpet (around a dozen outlets) for talent arrivals. Instead of the traditional on-site media coverage, Television Academy has partnered with CBS to create a virtual Emmy media center that will allow media to connect directly with Emmy winners when they are announced on the evening of the 19th. September.

Plans are still underway for the 2021 Creative Arts Emmys. Please be advised that there will be no red carpet at any of the three shows, but we are planning a very limited live media center to accommodate our presenters and winners each. evening.

We will be launching accreditation requests for the four-legged shows in the coming weeks and will forward the link when it becomes available.

On-site media, crew and vendors at all shows will need to test negative for COVID-19 and show proof of vaccination for admission.

The Television Academy had previously canceled post-Emmys Governors Ball events. As cases of the COVID-19 Delta variant continue to rise across the country, including in Los Angeles County, the Television Academy has also added a vaccination requirement for all attendees at this year’s Emmy ceremonies. . The organization joins most Hollywood events, including premieres, now requiring proof of vaccination prior to entry.

As previously reported, first in Variety, the Creative Arts Emmys will return to the Microsoft Theater in LA Live this year via three ceremonies on September 11 and 12. Like the CBS telecast on September 19, these three events will also feature a limited audience of nominees and their guests. Participants in the four shows will be required to present proof of vaccination for admission.

The TV Academy is re-launching smaller gatherings of peer groups honoring nominees in various categories, which typically take place throughout the week before the Primetime Emmys.

This year’s Creative Arts Emmys ceremonies will be televised for air Saturday, September 18 at 8 p.m. on FXX, the day before the Primetime Emmys airing. The 73rd Primetime Emmys airs September 19 on CBS, hosted by Cedric the Entertainer.


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