Print media – Saar New Media http://saar-new-media.com/ Thu, 13 Oct 2022 16:10:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://saar-new-media.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-6-150x150.png Print media – Saar New Media http://saar-new-media.com/ 32 32 Deep Dive: The Changing Landscape of Print Media https://saar-new-media.com/deep-dive-the-changing-landscape-of-print-media/ Thu, 13 Oct 2022 16:10:06 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/deep-dive-the-changing-landscape-of-print-media/ Local newspapers are dead! Long live the written press! As the United States celebrated National Newspaper Week through Oct. 8, mainstream media executives and industry watchers in the upstate say they see relentless pressure on their uncirculated business model, from declining readership to rising operational costs. “A lot of times you’ll hear the term ‘slow […]]]>

Local newspapers are dead! Long live the written press!

As the United States celebrated National Newspaper Week through Oct. 8, mainstream media executives and industry watchers in the upstate say they see relentless pressure on their uncirculated business model, from declining readership to rising operational costs.

“A lot of times you’ll hear the term ‘slow death of local journalism’, and there’s some truth to that, because it takes money to run a newspaper,” says Bryan Denham, professor of communications at the Clemson University, “And if advertisers feel like few people are watching it, they’ll make money.”

Steve Blackwell, publisher of The Greer Citizen, knows what happens next: “When these local newspapers leave these small communities, there is no longer a watchdog for government, for city councils, for school boards.

From 1986 to 1995 he was managing director of the hyperlocal Union Daily Times – which closed its doors two years ago after 170 years in business.

“It’s scary to have to depend on the honesty of every council member or every official,” he says.

Eddie Burch, whose family bought the Citizen in the 1940s, was editor of the weekly Greer for 18 years, beginning in 1989.

He says he and his reporters kept tabs on local government, where they could catch shenanigans such as, for example, a councilman spending city funds on “drinks in Hilton Head and fine restaurants in Hilton Head during the retirement from the municipal association when they were supposed to be at meetings.

He says he rarely missed a meeting of the Greer town council, where he reported on, among other things, tax increases and fee adjustments, which he compares to rising gas prices and grocery store: “And people need to know and understand why their taxes are going up. ”


“In the United States, about 9 in 10 adults get at least some news online, and the online space has become a host for the digital homes of traditional news outlets and new ‘web-born’ news outlets. .”

Source: Pew Research Center


Burch left in 2007, when Spartanburg-based family business Buchheit News Management acquired the Citizen. Since then he has been selling real estate for C. Dan Joyner, although he is still a contributing photographer for The Greenville News, Spartanburg Herald-Journal and Greer Now magazine.

He remembers his heyday when the century-old newspaper had little trouble attracting advertisers: “In the 80s, business was easy.

But from 2002 to 2020, US newspaper publishers saw their revenues plummet by 52%, according to the US Census Bureau in a June article titled “The Internet is Crushing Traditional Media: From Print to Digital.”

As for the number of Palmetto State newspapers, some 1,600 of them have been established here since 1732, according to the Encyclopedia of South Carolina.

Today, only four legacy news operations serve Greenville, according to the South Carolina Press Association. These include the Greenville Journal and The Greer Citizen with weekly print editions and the Greenville News and The Post and Courier. The Greenville News, which is part of a national public company, missed the deadline for comment.

The Post and Courier, the state’s oldest newspaper, launched in 1803, entered the Greenville market last year.

PJ Browning, president of the newspaper division of Evening Post Publishing and Charleston broadsheet publisher, says research has shown Greenville to be another “addressable market.”

The Pulitzer Prize-winning newspaper also leverages its statehouse journalist infrastructure and the resources available at the publishing company’s 15 other properties across the state, she said. And she points to a new series of richly reported and deeply local stories: “UNCOVERED: Shining a light on South Carolina corruption and misconduct.

“We thought, ‘You know what, it makes more sense for us to become this local, really hyperlocal news organization,” she said, adding, “It’s all about local, local, local. We have owners in South Carolina, so we care about South Carolina journalism.

The Post and Mail business model in the Upstate (Post and Mail are located in Greenville and Spartanburg) relies entirely on its statewide digital subscription base, which, according to Browning, sustains its upstate newsroom of 10 reporters.

“We’ve been providing local news here in Greenville for 23 years,” says Mark Johnston, president, CEO and co-founder of Community Journals, which publishes the Greenville Journal. “Our model is that we are 100% advertiser backed, with no paywall.” The Post and Courier’s strong paywall here, he argues, means fewer eyeballs, which means less ad revenue to support it.

Johnston is also leveraging other revenue streams, with robust digital marketing service offerings as well as six print and digital publications, including lifestyle, home and targeted magazines – all with a model of content that it believes differs from other local newsgathering companies.

Rather than expending the enormous time and resources required to produce investigative pieces, he says, “All of these municipal and county and civic organizations, charities, arts and entertainment need a capable vehicle. to communicate their message.

Its publications are free of charge and the targeted households receive the weekly printed edition of the Journal free of charge. If newsprint costs weren’t so prohibitive, not to mention a 20% increase in costs over the past year, he says he’d print one copy each for the county’s 200,000 homes.

“If you don’t have distribution and you don’t have content, you have nothing,” he says, then, echoing Blackwell, “And that’s scary.”

A journalist since the early 1980s, Johnston says, “The daily no longer exists and they had a responsibility to report on the changing community. Now we’re sort of the last man standing here.

Papers That Shrink in South Carolina

Between 2004 and 2018, South Carolina saw a 14% contraction in dailies and weeklies and a 23% drop in daily and weekly circulation.

2019
Daily: 15
Weeklies: 79 (73 now)
Total: 94

2004
Daily: 16
Weeklies: 93
Total 109

Distribution of newspapers

2019
Daily: 370,000
Weekly: 710,000
Total: 1.1 million

2004
Daily: 610,000
Weekly: 790,000
Total: 1.4 million

Source: UNC Hussman School of Journalism and Media, Center for Innovation and Sustainability in Local Media, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Expanding News Deserts

“The people of America’s new emerging deserts are often its most vulnerable cities,” according to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

  • Nearly 200 of the country’s 3,143 counties do not have a newspaper
  • More than 1,400 U.S. counties, ranging in size from several hundred to over a million people, have a newspaper, usually a weekly
  • More than 2,000 counties have no daily newspaper
  • Of about half of the country’s 7,112 newspapers – 1,283 dailies and 5,829 weeklies – more than 5,000, operating in small rural communities, have a circulation of less than 15,000 copies.

Sources: Living Without a Newspaper, “The Loss of Newspapers and Readers”, UNC Hussman School of Journalism and Media, Center for Innovation and Sustainability in Local Media, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

]]>
The Golden Age of Print Media: Cikapundung Print Market and Distribution Center – Thu 6 October 2022 https://saar-new-media.com/the-golden-age-of-print-media-cikapundung-print-market-and-distribution-center-thu-6-october-2022/ Wed, 05 Oct 2022 18:05:47 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/the-golden-age-of-print-media-cikapundung-print-market-and-distribution-center-thu-6-october-2022/ Anindito Ariwandono (The Jakarta post) PRIME Bandung ● Thu, October 6, 2022 As demand for print media plummets in the face of digitization, we take a closer look at the lives of some people in Bandung’s largest print market and distribution center. At 4 a.m., long before daybreak, piles of newspapers and magazines line the […]]]>

Anindito Ariwandono (The Jakarta post)

PRIME

Bandung ●
Thu, October 6, 2022

As demand for print media plummets in the face of digitization, we take a closer look at the lives of some people in Bandung’s largest print market and distribution center.

At 4 a.m., long before daybreak, piles of newspapers and magazines line the sidewalks of Jl. Ir. Sukarno in Bandung, West Java. Formerly named Jl. Cikapundung Timur, the area has been used as an informal distribution center and marketplace for the national print media since the late 1970s, where newsagents, peddlers and newspaper deliverers congregate before dispersing to every corner and corners of the city.

In the golden age of the print media, the turmoil lasted until noon, when the afternoon editions of some newspapers were fresh off the presses and dropped off in bulk at the distribution center.

read the full story

SUBSCRIBE NOW

From IDR 55,500/month

  • Unlimited access to our web and app content
  • e-Post digital newspaper
  • No ads, no interruptions
  • Privileged access to our events and programs
  • Subscription to our newsletters

Or let Google manage your subscription

]]>
The Golden Age of Print Media: Cikapundung Print Market and Distribution Center – Community https://saar-new-media.com/the-golden-age-of-print-media-cikapundung-print-market-and-distribution-center-community/ Wed, 05 Oct 2022 06:07:43 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/the-golden-age-of-print-media-cikapundung-print-market-and-distribution-center-community/ Anindito Ariwandono (The Jakarta post) PRIME Bandung ● Wed, October 5, 2022 As demand for print media plummets in the face of digitization, we take a closer look at the lives of some people in Bandung’s largest print market and distribution center. At 4 a.m., long before daybreak, piles of newspapers and magazines line the […]]]>

Anindito Ariwandono (The Jakarta post)

PRIME

Bandung ●
Wed, October 5, 2022

As demand for print media plummets in the face of digitization, we take a closer look at the lives of some people in Bandung’s largest print market and distribution center.

At 4 a.m., long before daybreak, piles of newspapers and magazines line the sidewalks of Jl. Ir. Sukarno in Bandung, West Java. Formerly named Jl. Cikapundung Timur, the area has been used as an informal distribution center and marketplace for the national print media since the late 1970s, where newsagents, peddlers and newspaper deliverers congregate before dispersing to every corner and corners of the city.

In the golden age of the print media, the turmoil lasted until noon, when the afternoon editions of some newspapers were fresh off the presses and dropped off in bulk at the distribution center.

read the full story

SUBSCRIBE NOW

From IDR 55,500/month

  • Unlimited access to our web and app content
  • e-Post digital newspaper
  • No ads, no interruptions
  • Privileged access to our events and programs
  • Subscription to our newsletters


]]>
The AMF 2022 session highlights the challenges of the written press in the digital age https://saar-new-media.com/the-amf-2022-session-highlights-the-challenges-of-the-written-press-in-the-digital-age/ Tue, 04 Oct 2022 23:29:13 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/the-amf-2022-session-highlights-the-challenges-of-the-written-press-in-the-digital-age/ – Editors of leading GCC dailies share their views on prospects for print media in the Arab world The 20th edition of the Arab Media Forum (AMF), the region’s premier annual event for the media industry, hosted a panel discussion entitled “Arab Media 2022: A Gulf Perspective”, which highlighted challenges faced by Arab […]]]>


– Editors of leading GCC dailies share their views on prospects for print media in the Arab world

The 20th edition of the Arab Media Forum (AMF), the region’s premier annual event for the media industry, hosted a panel discussion entitled “Arab Media 2022: A Gulf Perspective”, which highlighted challenges faced by Arab print media in the digital world. age.

The panel, moderated by Sky News Arabia presenter Eissa Al Marzooqi, saw editors from prominent daily newspapers in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) region share their views on the outlook for print media in the Arab world in the context of the rapid proliferation of social media around the world.

Muna Busamra, Editor-in-Chief of Al Bayan (UAE) newspaper, stressed the importance of focusing more on GCC issues rather than covering breaking news all over the world. Busamra identified three approaches that can help GCC media tap into opportunities for growth: nurturing young talent to develop future media skills, focusing on positivity, and building on the region’s successes to meet challenges. Busamra highlighted the success of the Arab Media Forum (AMF) in bringing together more than 3,000 media stakeholders, which she said signifies the success of the UAE in ensuring a safe environment for events and accelerating recovery in the post-pandemic phase.

Walid Al Nosf, Editor-in-Chief of Kuwaiti newspaper Al Qabas, called on media in the GCC region to allocate larger budgets to develop their digital skills, deploy the latest technologies to take advantage of new opportunities and reach wider audiences. and younger. Al Nosf highlighted the success of the digital transformation achieved by the Al Qabas newspaper through a partnership with the British daily The Guardian.

Jameel Al Theyabi, editor-in-chief of the Saudi newspaper Okaz, also stressed the importance for regional media to develop a stronger presence on social networks and to provide reliable information, which will allow them to build on trust. won by established mainstream media over the years.
Moanes Al Mardi, Editor of Bahrain’s Al Bilad newspaper, focused on ways to expand media reach using social media platforms such as Twitter, YouTube and Instagram. Moanes said government support was crucial in promoting the growth of Arab social media platforms.

Launched 20 years ago, the Arab Media Forum is one of the highlights of the Dubai Press Club’s annual calendar of events. The largest media gathering in the Arab world, AMF has become the most comprehensive platform for knowledge exchange in the Arab media community. The annual platform, which attracts thousands of prominent thought leaders, has constantly evolved in scope and reach to encompass a broad international perspective.

For more photos and press releases, go to the AMF’s digital press kit: https://bit.ly/3M1ledy

]]>
National and local print media ignore new Guardian report showing ‘shocking’ levels of lead in Chicago water https://saar-new-media.com/national-and-local-print-media-ignore-new-guardian-report-showing-shocking-levels-of-lead-in-chicago-water/ Tue, 04 Oct 2022 17:16:03 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/national-and-local-print-media-ignore-new-guardian-report-showing-shocking-levels-of-lead-in-chicago-water/ The country’s five major national newspapers – The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, USA Today and Los Angeles Times – alongside Chicago’s major local newspapers – Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times and Daily Herald – all ignored a new report from The Guardian exposing horrifically high levels of lead in Chicago’s […]]]>

The country’s five major national newspapers – The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, USA Today and Los Angeles Times – alongside Chicago’s major local newspapers – Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times and Daily Herald – all ignored a new report from The Guardian exposing horrifically high levels of lead in Chicago’s tap water.

On September 21, The Guardian published a stunning new report that revealed “shocking” levels of lead in Chicago’s water supply. The Guardian and water engineer Elin Betanzo analyzed a wealth of Chicago data on water testing performed between 2016 and 2021 and found that “one in 20 tap water tests performed for thousands of Chicagoans found lead, a nerve metal, at or above US government levels. limits.” According to the report, “Chicago itself has never released an analysis of the results.”

The Guardian also found that nine of the top 10 postcodes with the highest amount of lead were black and Hispanic neighborhoods; a particular home in a predominantly black neighborhood had “lead levels of 1,100 parts per billion (ppb) – 73 times the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) limit of 15 ppb.” Betanzo, who drew attention to the water crises in Washington, DC, and Flint, Michigan, warned of the “potent” and “irreversible” consequences of untreated lead in water for children and adults.

From September 21 to October 4, the following national newspapers did not cover the report at all: The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and The Los Angeles Times. Although Chicago’s three largest local newspapers – the Chicago Tribune, the Chicago Sun-Times and the Daily Herald – have previously covered the city’s severe lead water crisis, all three ignored this new report from The Guardian.

The failure of national and local newspapers to cover this critical new data on Chicago’s lead problem is emblematic of a broader trend in mainstream media – whether print or television – to ignore environmental concerns until recently. until the problem took on dramatic proportions. Flint’s ongoing water crisis was mostly ignored by national newspapers at its height in 2014 and 2015, and they didn’t draw attention to it until 2016 when a national emergency was declared. declared by the governor.

Even when the mainstream media has covered environmental concerns like water crises, they tend to ignore how disproportionately they affect communities of color. In coverage of the recent water crisis in Jackson, Mississippi, the cable and broadcast networks spent very little time discussing it within an environmental justice framework, burying the context that the lack of running water in the city disproportionately affects black communities.

Methodology

Media Matters searched the Factiva database for stories in the top 5 US newspapers by circulation (Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, USA Today, The Wall Street Journal and The Washington Post) and the top 3 local newspapers in Chicago by circulation (Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times and Daily Herald) for the term “Chicago” and any of the terms “water”, “lead”, “neurotoxin” or “Guardian” in the headline or paragraph lede of the 21 September 2022, until October 4, 2022.

We have defined articles as examples that reference the Chicago water crisis or The Guardian report in the headline or lead paragraph.

]]>
COLUMN: The written press still has an impact | Opinion https://saar-new-media.com/column-the-written-press-still-has-an-impact-opinion/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/column-the-written-press-still-has-an-impact-opinion/ It’s a little selfish, but I’d like to give the print media a well-deserved pat on the back. Several weeks ago, Local Journalism Initiative reporter Mark Brett wrote about the lack of volunteers for Penticton’s school breakfast program. We published an article on page 1 of the Penticton Herald where the coordinator pleaded for volunteers. […]]]>

It’s a little selfish, but I’d like to give the print media a well-deserved pat on the back.

Several weeks ago, Local Journalism Initiative reporter Mark Brett wrote about the lack of volunteers for Penticton’s school breakfast program. We published an article on page 1 of the Penticton Herald where the coordinator pleaded for volunteers. Other media also published this story. The end result – 100 inquiries.

Who says no one reads print?

—————

I’m about halfway through Susan McIver’s new book, Long Time Dead (Friedan Press, 194 pages, softcover) which investigates the mysterious death of her great-uncle in 1957.

His research is meticulous, his narration captivating.

The project was a labor of love for the retired coroner, whose name you might recognize from the pages of the Herald where she is an occasional contributor after many years covering the Summerland council.

A book launch will be held September 23 at the Maple Roch on Victoria Street in Summerland from 6:30-8 p.m.

————

So you know… Four of Summerland’s council candidates have last names beginning with the letter B.

—————

If you want an example of investigative reporting at its best – and in a small market – look no further than “Camper Shot by Police Expecting Trouble” by Joe Fries. It was featured on page 1 of Thursday’s Herald and, in case you missed it, the story is published on the Herald’s website.

—————

Ringo Starr is coming to the South Okanagan Events Center on October 9. This will be the ninth time I’ve seen the All-Starr Band, which has changed several times over the years. While I’ve met Beatles fans who’ve seen Paul McCartney nine or more times, I’ve yet to meet a Ringo Deadhead. I could be arrested for harassment.

—————

Congratulations belated to the organizers of the Pentastic HOT Jazz Festival and the Penticton Dragon Boat Festival. Both have been running well for over 20 years and have survived the two-year pandemic shutdown. My wife is a dragon boater (go Golden Dragons go!) and we both enjoy the exceptional music offered at the jazz festival. Overall last weekend was pretty good for both of us.

—————

I tried watching the Emmys this week and found there were too many categories, too many nominees and, frankly, too many shows. With all streaming services, television has never looked better. It’s also impossible to track. Back when there were only three major US networks (two in Canada), you knew the premise and characters of each show.

—————

This is the last Miller Time column until October 21, 2022. I will be on leave until October 17. When I return.

James Miller is editor of the Penticton Herald.

]]>
Russia: Moscow court revokes Novaya Gazeta’s print media license https://saar-new-media.com/russia-moscow-court-revokes-novaya-gazetas-print-media-license/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 07:52:38 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/russia-moscow-court-revokes-novaya-gazetas-print-media-license/ The International and European Federation of Journalists (IFJ/EFJ) join their Russian affiliate, the Journalists and Media Workers Union (JMWU), in calling on the Russian authorities to reverse the recent decision to suspend the printing license of the independent newspaper Novaya Gazeta and to end censorship of the publication and its journalists. On September 5, a […]]]>

The International and European Federation of Journalists (IFJ/EFJ) join their Russian affiliate, the Journalists and Media Workers Union (JMWU), in calling on the Russian authorities to reverse the recent decision to suspend the printing license of the independent newspaper Novaya Gazeta and to end censorship of the publication and its journalists.

On September 5, a Moscow court upheld a request by Russian media regulator Roskomnadzor to revoke the newspaper’s printing license. The newspaper announced that it would appeal the decision.

Novaya Gazeta ceased printing in Russia on March 28, after receiving official warnings for allegedly failing to mark documents produced by so-called “foreign agents.” The court ruling would prevent the newspaper from resuming printing in the future. Roskomnadzor had accused the publication of failing to provide documents related to a change in ownership in 2006.

Novaya GazetaThe editor of Dmitry Muratov, who won the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize, said the decision was “a political political stunt, without the slightest legal basis”.

Some of the newspaper’s staff fled Russia and launched a new outlet, Novaya Gazeta Europe, published in several cities in Europe.

JMWU office secretary Andrei Jvirblis said: “This court decision makes no sense since the editorial staff itself suspended publication of the newspaper during the so-called ‘special operation on the territory of Ukraine’. “. This is a symbolic act by which the Russian authorities distance themselves from glasnost and the values ​​of democracy and freedom embodied by this newspaper. This will not prevent our colleagues from Novaya Gazeta from continuing to do their work, with or unlicensed.

The IFJ and the EFJ condemned the “travesty of justice”. They demanded that the withdrawal of the newspaper’s license be revoked.

]]>
Are Media’s Jane Huxley on the survival of print media in Australia and the acceleration of e-commerce in publishing https://saar-new-media.com/are-medias-jane-huxley-on-the-survival-of-print-media-in-australia-and-the-acceleration-of-e-commerce-in-publishing/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/are-medias-jane-huxley-on-the-survival-of-print-media-in-australia-and-the-acceleration-of-e-commerce-in-publishing/ “We’re selling a magazine every second in Australia right now,” Are Media CEO Jane Huxley said at Mumbrella’s Publish conference on Wednesday. “That’s not a sign of a business slowing down anytime soon. If we sold a magazine every ten minutes, yes, we could say yes, it’s something to start thinking about, but we sell […]]]>

“We’re selling a magazine every second in Australia right now,” Are Media CEO Jane Huxley said at Mumbrella’s Publish conference on Wednesday. “That’s not a sign of a business slowing down anytime soon. If we sold a magazine every ten minutes, yes, we could say yes, it’s something to start thinking about, but we sell an extraordinary amount of magazines.

Are Media is Australia’s largest women’s content company, according to Roy Morgan, and reaches nine out of ten women each year through its portfolio of brands, including The Australian Women’s Weekly, marie claire, Gourmet Traveller, Better Homes & Gardens , Woman’s Day, Country Style. , paradise of beauty and generosity.

Are Media CEO Jane Huxley at the Mumbrella Publish 2022 conference.

During the fireside chat, Huxley shared his vision for the changing publishing landscape in Australia, with top priority shifting to Are Media as CEO and making strides in e-commerce.

ADVERTISING

“I think Are Media has built up a really good muscle over the last two years and learned pretty quickly how to work from home,” Huxley said. “The team pivoted very quickly, and we never missed a deadline, and it was pretty amazing to see people adapt so quickly to the print side of our business, which takes a lot of creativity. , it requires a lot of people working together. The way people have adapted was phenomenal.

As Huxley took his first steps into the Park Street publishing house, Huxley clearly knew where his top priorities lay.

“It was to keep that stability that the former head of the company really worked hard to create and to show up for the company,” she said. Being the company’s first female CEO, I feel like I had an advantage from day one. A lot of our organization looks, feels and sounds like me, so I had a little natural advantage there.

When Huxley took over 15 months ago, she sat at reception, fielded calls and went to news agencies to pack shelves, which Huxley considered crucial to understanding the company.

“Supply chain is everything to a CEO. I hadn’t worked in mag publishing. I’ve been in content companies all my life, but I didn’t really know how magazine publishing worked. “, she said. “So I followed the supply chain, from the initial idea that we wanted to put in the magazine, until it arrived in the hands of a customer. “

Jane Huxley at the Mumbrella Publish 2022 conference.

Huxley said she sat and worked alongside individual teams for each magazine within the company, then talked to designers and reviewed all of the technology that underpins the entire company, with Huxley adding: “I went to the print shop and then followed that through to distribution, where we pick and pack the magazines, put them in lorries, we send a lorry to every news agency and supermarket in Australia and New Zealand , twice a week. The operation behind this is extraordinary.

Regarding the future of Are Media and the publishing industry in Australia, Huxley said that while magazine circulation shows no signs of slowing down and there is a clear need for print titles here, the future of content for the enterprise is e-commerce.

“We’re proud to be in the printing business because customers love it. However, we are starting to invest more in the digital marketplace and have amazing communities at Bounty and beautyheaven.

In March, Are Media acquired Australian e-commerce company Hard to Find. The Acquisition Will Significantly Expand Are Media’s Existing Content Commerce Capabilities, Strengthen Its Revenue Diversification Strategy, and Leverage Hard to Find Technology to Engage Audiences Even More With Are Media’s Brands and Content .

“When you think about the role of magazines and the role of content at Are Media, traditionally 125 years ago the role of magazines and content in Australia has really been to inform, to influence, to inspire, and that that happens at the end of that is, there’s usually a transaction,” Huxley said. “We have audiences that are browse audiences, but a lot of our audiences at the time in print and digital today is what we call intent-based audiences, especially in the home industry.”

She added, “These customers buy the magazine and browse the product with the intention of doing something. The way we monetize that is clearly through broadcasts and then through advertising, because advertisers see its position very clearly in an intent audience. But, when you take it a step further, the future of content for us is e-commerce.

]]>
APNS urges governments to speed up payments to print media companies – Pakistan IG News https://saar-new-media.com/apns-urges-governments-to-speed-up-payments-to-print-media-companies-pakistan-ig-news/ Wed, 24 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/apns-urges-governments-to-speed-up-payments-to-print-media-companies-pakistan-ig-news/ Karachi: The All Pakistan Newspapers Society (APNS) Executive Committee held its meeting under the chairmanship of its President Sarmad Ali on 23rd August 2022 at APNS House, Karachi. Executive Committee members reported that due to late payments from the federal and provincial governments, member publications were facing serious financial difficulties. The committee called on the […]]]>

Karachi: The All Pakistan Newspapers Society (APNS) Executive Committee held its meeting under the chairmanship of its President Sarmad Ali on 23rd August 2022 at APNS House, Karachi.

Executive Committee members reported that due to late payments from the federal and provincial governments, member publications were facing serious financial difficulties. The committee called on the federal and provincial governments to speed up payments to print media so that newspapers can meet their expenses.

Executive Committee members agreed that a press campaign should be launched to highlight the importance of print media. The Executive Committee expressed concern over the devastation caused by the recent floods and heavy rains and sympathized with the people of Balochistan, Sindh and South Punjab. The Executive Committee asked member publications to educate the national press about the plight of the affected floods.

The Executive Committee adopted the Publicity Committee’s report on the applications of various advertising agencies and granted provisional recognition to M/s. Marshmallow Advertising (Pvt) Ltd., Lahore, M/s. FOCUS 360 MARKETING (PVT) LTD, Rawalpindi, M/s. Spot on Associates, Karachi and M/s. CommerceLens (Pvt) Ltd., Karachi. M/s replenishment request. Linkers Communications (Pvt) Limited, Islamabad has also been approved.

The meeting was attended by: Sarmad Ali, President, Shahab Juberi, Vice President, Nazafarin Saigol Lakhani, Secretary General, Bilal Farooqui (Daily Agaz), Fauzia Shaheen (Monthly Dastak), Najmuddin Sheikh (Daily Deenat), Muhammad Waqaruddin (Daily World) ), Bilal Mahmood (Weekly Family), Muhammad Yunus Mehr (Daily Bustle), Qazi Asad Abid (Daily Ibrat), Syed Akbar Tahir (Daily Jasrat), Muhammad Manzoor Rana (Daily Mashrik, Quetta), Zahida Abbasi (Daily Nau Sizz), Salman Qureshi (Monthly Naya Digest), Mubashir Mir (Daily Pakistan, Lahore), Faisal Zahid Malik (Pakistan Observer) and Dr. Waqar Yusuf Azimi (Monthly Rouhani Digest).

Participating in the Zoom meeting: Irfan Athar (Daily Business), Mohsin Bilal, Co-Secretary, Muhammad Awais Khushnood, Finance Secretary, Mumtaz A. Tahir (Daily Aftab), Waseem Ahmed (Daily Awam, Quetta), Ansar Mahmood Bhatti (Monthly Center Line), Imtinen Shahid (Daily Khabareen) and Rukhsana Soulat Salimi (Weekly Nikhar).

Copyright Business Recorder, 2022

]]>
Officeworks enters print media with free in-store magazine https://saar-new-media.com/officeworks-enters-print-media-with-free-in-store-magazine/ Thu, 18 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://saar-new-media.com/officeworks-enters-print-media-with-free-in-store-magazine/ Officeworks has launched the first issue of its new in-store magazine, which is available for free both in-store nationwide and online through content partner Medium Rare Content Agency. The publication includes gift guides, arts and crafts activities for adults and children, home office updates, tech tips and more, and will be distributed to 250,000 copies […]]]>

Officeworks has launched the first issue of its new in-store magazine, which is available for free both in-store nationwide and online through content partner Medium Rare Content Agency.

The publication includes gift guides, arts and crafts activities for adults and children, home office updates, tech tips and more, and will be distributed to 250,000 copies in the network of 167 Officeworks stores targeting a wide variety of customers.

The magazine is the latest instance of content created by Officeworks, complementing the Officeworks Noteworthy digital content platform as well as the Officeworks provider and advertising offering across owned channels, including catalog, digital advertising, email and more.

Each issue will cover five themes – Work, Learn, Create, Connect and Give – and feature ideas from local artists, business experts, designers and popular personalities.

The launch of Officeworks magazine comes as Australians are increasingly interested in branded magazines. In May 2022, market researchers Roy Morgan found that 14.8 million Australians read magazines, with free branded magazines making up three of the four most read publications.

Jessica Richmond, Managing Director of Marketing & Insights at Officeworks, said, “The market is continually evolving and so are the products and services we offer our customers. Our new Officeworks magazine is designed to inspire customers to make things happen, while showcasing our wide range of products and services.

“The launch of our magazine builds on the success of our Noteworthy content platform, providing customers with another way to engage with our brand and discover something new as they work, learn, create and grow. connect from anywhere in Australia.”

Nick Smith, Managing Director of Medium Rare, said: “Medium Rare is delighted to partner with Officeworks, a company we have proudly worked with for a long time, to produce and publish the new Officeworks magazine. We have already enjoyed a successful three-year working relationship through our collaboration on the launch of the Noteworthy content platform and the production of award-winning content that helps customers work, learn, create and connect.

“The new magazine is fresh, fun and colorful – and showcases the wide range of Officeworks products in a lifestyle format that will be relevant to readers’ lives.”

Officeworks magazine will be available for free in-store and online four times a year starting Thursday, August 18, 2022.

]]>