Liberal Media Warns of White Supremacy, Far-Right Extremism Among Hispanic, Black Republicans: Analysis

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Amid a number of notable Republican victories involving minority candidates and shifting voting trends in the United States, liberal media has sounded the alarm over a perceived new political emergence: white supremacy and extremism. extreme right among black and Hispanic conservatives.

On Wednesday, the New York Times published an article titled “The Rise of the Far-Right Latina,” referencing Mayra Flores, the first Mexican-born female House member, and two other Republican Latinas running for office, Monica DeLaCruz. and Cassy Garcia.

The article claimed that Flores had turned his Texas seat from blue to red by “avoiding moderates” while “embracing the far right.”

“More Marjorie Taylor Greene than Kay Bailey Hutchison,” is how national political writer Jennifer Medina described her.

MAYRA FLORES FIRE BACK AFTER NEW YORK TIMES CALLED HER ‘FAR RIGHT LATINA’: PAPER KNOWS ‘NOT ABOUT ME’

Rep. Mayra Flores is interviewed outside the Capitol after being sworn in on June 21, 2022.
(Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images)

After winning a special election last month in the state’s 34th congressional district, she will run for a full term in November against Democratic Representative Vicente Gonzalez on a new card that favors him. It’s the first time South Texas’ Rio Grande Valley has sent a Hispanic Republican to Congress in 10 years. The liberal media has frequently criticized the Republican Party for its lack of diversity, but now seems concerned that Hispanic voters are turning conservative.

For his accusation of calling Flores a far-right, Medina’s evidence included an earlier case in which the Texas representative called for the impeachment of President Biden, calling the Democratic Party “the biggest threat facing America.” faces,” supporting Donald Trump’s conservative policies and tweeting the QAnon hashtags. In this latest example, Flores repeatedly denied that the hashtags were intended to support the conspiracy theory group, but instead drew attention to and denounced it. Those tweets were also deleted amid scrutiny. Flores also did not respond to a reporter’s question about whether Biden was a legitimately elected president.

Medina’s evidence for labeling De La Cruz and Garcia as “far right” was that they are all “pro-Trump.”

By comparison, The New York Times offered a much more comfortable dive into another Latina politician, Democratic Rep. Alexandria-Ocasio Cortez, in 2018 after her upset Democratic primary victory in New York.

The article described Ocasio-Cortez as a “political rock star” who never failed to speak her mind or stand up for her values. Notably, the Times’ interest in radical political philosophy did not extend to the avowed Democratic socialist, who currently holds a 97% progressive score on the Congressional ProgressivePunch voting database.

DEMOCRATIC PARTY DROPPED HISPANIC COMMUNITY TO FOCUS ON WHITE LIBERALS: MAYRA FLORES

Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez speaks during an immigration rally outside the U.S. Capitol on December 7, 2021.

Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez speaks during an immigration rally outside the U.S. Capitol on December 7, 2021.
(Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Speaking to Fox News Digital, the Latino director of the Media Research Center, Jorge Bonilla, criticized the Times article on Flores as an “ethnic disqualification article”.

“We never heard of the ‘rise of the socialist Latina’ when the AOC was elected because that is the presumed norm of the left. Since Latino identity is inextricably linked to leftist politics, the piece serves to identify the Texas Trio to the rest of the media as racial traitors and therefore non-entities within the communities they aim to represent in Congress,” Bonilla said.

He went on to add that the media assumes that blacks, Hispanics and other ethnic minorities are “permanent members of the Democratic coalition” to engage on “race issues.”

But the Times article on “far-right” Latinas is far from the first time in recent memory that the liberal media has expressed concern about conservative political extremism among minority groups.

Another notable Republican, Virginia Lieutenant Governor Winsome Sears also faced heavy criticism from the media when she was elected alongside Governor Glenn Youngkin in 2021. Sears is the first black woman elected to state office from Virginia, a Jamaican immigrant, and a veteran of the Marine Corps. , but that hasn’t stopped outlets from linking her to the far right.

VIRGINIA LT. GOV. WINSOME SEARS: ‘TOO MANY OF OUR POLITICAL LEADERS’ USE RACE ‘TO DIVIDE US’

Winsome Sears celebrates winning the race for lieutenant governor during election night in Chantilly, Va., Nov. 3, 2021.

Winsome Sears celebrates winning the race for lieutenant governor during election night in Chantilly, Va., Nov. 3, 2021.
(Reuters/Elizabeth Frantz)

In November, liberal commentator Michael Eric Dyson called Sears a “black mouth” for white supremacy.

“You do what all political figures have to do: make choices,” Dyson said on MSNBC. “The problem here is that they want white supremacy by ventriloquist effect. There is a moving black mouth but a white idea…running on the trail of the tongue of a figure who justifies and legitimizes white supremacist practices” , said Dyson.

As Dyson spoke, “The Reidout” showed the chyron, “Republicans roll out ‘get out of racism’ card in VA.”

Former ESPN host Jemele Hill days earlier also attributed white supremacy to Sears’ victory.

A week later, after his historic victory, ABC News’ FiveThirtyEight pointed to prejudice and racist white voters for Sears’ success, publishing an article about why “racist white voters favor black Republicans.”

The authors, Hakeem Jefferson, an assistant professor at Stanford University, and Micheal Tessler, a professor at the University of California, Irvine, criticized those who dismissed “Republican racism” because of Sears’ election victory.

“But supporting a black candidate does little to prevent voters from holding racist beliefs and motivations. Republicans are increasingly more likely than Democrats to be minority-biased, so black Republicans like Sears often enjoy particularly strong support from [W]hitting Americans with otherwise anti-Black views simply because they draw the bulk of their support from Republican voters,” Jefferson and Tesler wrote.

Former California GOP gubernatorial candidate Larry Elder also faced similar comments on the campaign trail, with the Los Angeles Times proclaiming Elder to be the “black face” of white supremacy.

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Larry Elder sits in his hotel room in San Francisco, California on July 14, 2021.

Larry Elder sits in his hotel room in San Francisco, California on July 14, 2021.
(Nina Riggio/The San Francisco Chronicle)

Outside of minority conservative politicians, the media has also repeatedly expressed concerns about the shift of black and Hispanic Americans to the Republican Party. Some have been downright confused as to why these groups would choose to be conservative.

Perhaps one of the most egregious examples came from ABC’s “The View,” when co-host Sunny Hostin called black Republicans an “oxymoron” on May 6.

Guest co-host Lindsey Granger said there were “many conservative values” she would like to talk about.

“Are you a Republican? Hostin asked Granger, to which she confirmed she was.

“I feel like that’s an oxymoron, black Republican,” Hostin said, interrupting him.

“Why? Your friend here is a Republican,” Granger retorted, referring to Ana Navarro, who identifies as a Republican, despite now being a die-hard Democrat supporter and even working for Biden’s 2020 campaign. Hostin later said she “didn’t understand” black Republicans or Latino Republicans.

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According to an April poll from Quinnipiac University, Biden’s approval among Hispanic voters is just 26%. That same poll found approval from white voters at 31% and black voters at 63%. When it comes to the most pressing issues facing the country today, a plurality of Latino voters said inflation was their biggest concern at 31%.

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